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  • Author or Editor: Glen W. Kent x
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Magnolia has graced southern landscapes for many years. However, its northern distribution is limited due to injury at low, freezing temperatures. Laboratory methods are available to assess the cold hardiness of many plants, but specific methods for Southern magnolia have not been established. Effects of exposure time, temperature at which plants were frozen, rate of warming, sample size and methods of injury evaluation were investigated. With exposure to -1.5 and -4C the leaves and stems were not injured when frozen for up to 7h. Stems and leaves that were nucleated with ice at -4C underestimated the cold hardiness as compared to similar plants that were nucleated at -1.5 and -3C. Samples warmed as taken from the temperature bath at 4C or at 4C/hr in the bath exhibited less injury than those taken directly out of the bath and exposed to room temperature. Similar cold hardiness determinations were obtained using whole and half leaf samples, while a quarter of a leaf or a leaf disk exhibited high variability and resulted in unreliable cold hardiness determinations. Visual analysis for injury was compared to electrolyte leakage and similar cold hardiness levels were obtained using the two methods.

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Magnolia has graced southern landscapes for many years. However, its northern distribution is limited due to injury at low, freezing temperatures. Laboratory methods are available to assess the cold hardiness of many plants, but specific methods for Southern magnolia have not been established. Effects of exposure time, temperature at which plants were frozen, rate of warming, sample size and methods of injury evaluation were investigated. With exposure to -1.5 and -4C the leaves and stems were not injured when frozen for up to 7h. Stems and leaves that were nucleated with ice at -4C underestimated the cold hardiness as compared to similar plants that were nucleated at -1.5 and -3C. Samples warmed as taken from the temperature bath at 4C or at 4C/hr in the bath exhibited less injury than those taken directly out of the bath and exposed to room temperature. Similar cold hardiness determinations were obtained using whole and half leaf samples, while a quarter of a leaf or a leaf disk exhibited high variability and resulted in unreliable cold hardiness determinations. Visual analysis for injury was compared to electrolyte leakage and similar cold hardiness levels were obtained using the two methods.

Free access