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  • Author or Editor: Glen N. Davis x
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Abstract

The freezing behavior of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] flower buds was influenced by the temperature at which ice formation was initiated. Buds seeded with ice just below 0°C were more likely to exhibit deep supercooling, and water in the primordia would supercool to lower temperatures than in unseeded excised flower buds. This effect was not always expressed and varied with the stage of acclimation. Researchers using differential thermal analysis to estimate bud hardiness will need to evaluate this effect. Seeding specimens with ice may be warranted to obtain results comparable with field conditions.

Open Access

Abstract

Allium galanthum, A. drobovii, A. pskemense, A. roylei, and A. cepa type have the same chromosome number (n = 8), as A. cepa. The karyotypes of these species have been described. Each species has seven V-shaped chromosomes. These can be grouped as metacentric, median, submedian, and one subterminal. The subterminal chromosome has a satellite attached to its short arm. There are no other conspicuous morphological markers on the chromosomes, such as knobs or heterochromatic blocks. Chromomeres in the several species are of the same size and are present along the entire length of the chromosomes.

Slight differences were found in the morphology of the genomes of these species. The genome in A. roylei is the longest–63.44 µ, while that of A. cepa type is the shortest–56.18 µ. Allium cepa and A. pskemense have the same genome length, but there are slight differences in the morphology of the individual chromosomes. Allium cepa and A. cepa type have a wider and bigger satellite than that present in the other species. The differences among the members of the complement in A. cepa, A. cepa type, and A. galanthum are less pronounced than in A. pskemense, A. roylei, and A. drobovii. It seems that these species may have had a common ancestor, and that chromosomal differences have arisen due to inversions, translocations, and pairing in unequal chromosomes.

Open Access