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Summaira Riaz, Keith E. Garrison, Gerald S. Dangl, Jean-Michel Boursiquot, and Carole P. Meredith

In total, 25 clones of Vitis vinifera `Pinot noir' and 22 clones of `Chardonnay' were analyzed with 100 microsatellite markers, selected from an initial screening of 228 markers. Of the 100 markers, 17 detected polymorphism within one or both of the cultivars. In `Pinot noir', 15 polymorphic markers detected 15 different genotypes, uniquely distinguished 12 clones out of the 25 and separated the remaining 13 clones into 3 groups. In `Chardonnay', 9 polymorphic markers detected 9 genotypes and uniquely distinguished 6 clones out of the 22. The remaining 16 clones were separated into 3 groups. For markers that were polymorphic in `Pinot noir' and `Chardonnay', none of the variant alleles were common to both cultivars. It is inferred from this result that the natural cross that produced `Chardonnay' probably occurred when `Pinot' was still relatively young. Many of the variant genotypes were expressed as three alleles. Further analysis revealed the presence of chimeras in which the third allele was present in leaf but not root or wood tissues, confirming that the grape apical meristem is functionally two-layered. Some clones that share the same microsatellite genotype are documented to have originated in the same locality, suggesting that the origins of undocumented clones may be traced by comparing their microsatellite genotypes with those of well-documented clones. Because clones of `Pinot noir' and `Chardonnay' are often visually indistinguishable, microsatellite genotyping may also be useful to detect identification errors in collections and nurseries.

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Gerald S. Dangl, Keith Woeste, Mallikarjuna K. Aradhya, Anne Koehmstedt, Chuck Simon, Daniel Potter, Charles A. Leslie, and Gale McGranahan

One hundred and forty-seven primer pairs originally designed to amplify microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR), in black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) were screened for utility in persian walnut (J. regia L.). Based on scorability and number of informative polymorphisms, the best 14 loci were selected to analyze a diverse group of 47 persian walnut accessions and one J. hindsii (Jepson) Jepson ex R.E. Sm × J. regia hybrid (Paradox) rootstock. Among the 48 accessions, there were 44 unique multi-locus profiles; the accessions with identical profiles appeared to be synonyms. The pairwise genetic distance based on proportion of shared alleles was calculated for all accessions and a UPGMA (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean) dendrogram constructed. The results agree well with what is known about the pedigree and/or origins of the genotypes. The SSR markers distinguished pairs of closely related cultivars and should be able to uniquely characterize all walnut cultivars with the exception of budsports. They provide a more powerful and reliable system for the molecular characterization of walnut germplasm than those previously tested. These markers have numerous applications for the walnut industry, including cultivar identification, verification of pedigrees for cultivar and rootstock breeding programs, paternity analysis, and understanding the genetic diversity of germplasm collections.