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Gerald Klingaman and G.L. Wheeler

Eight species of woody nursery stock were grown in 4 liter containers and fertilized with a conventional resin-coated slow release material (at 3.5 g N per container) or composted poultry manure applied as a top dressed or incorporated with nitrogen rates ranging from 1.0 to 11.2 g N per container. In all cases the conventional resin-coated product outperformed composted poultry manure by factors of 2 to 3 times (for height, dry weight and quality score). Although a rate response was observed with the composted, even the highest rate of nitrogen application produced plants with dry weights of 1/2 that of the control. When comparing the sources of composted poultry manure alone, the 4-4-4 product outperformed the 2-2-2 compost, even with equivalent rates of nitrogen, for 3 of the 8 species studied. Incorporation proved superior to topdressing for the 4-4-4 source but topdressing was superior for the 2-2-2 material. These studies are part of a nutrient partitioning experiment being conducted to determine the fate of nitrogen released from composted poultry manure.

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Gerald L. Klingaman and Troy Henderson

Amaryllis bulb production is conducted in Africa, and to a lesser extent in Central America, Holland and Israel. Preliminary studies have shown bulb production is feasible in zone 6b using unheated greenhouses and thermal blankets during cold periods. Spun bound polyester (Reemay) and polystyrene foam (Sentinel) provided a maximum of 9C protection over outside conditions. Amaryllis bulbs have been uninjured during two successive winters. A twin scale propagation experiment was conducted on the cultivar Appleblossom. Cuttings 15mm wide that were placed in closed, vermiculite-filled plastic bags or uncovered, vermiculite-filled plastic trays produced 1.5 bulbs per cutting. Cuttings 7.5mm wide that were placed in soil in plastic bags or open flats averaged .34 bulbs per cutting. From 75 to 80 bulblets were produced per mother bulb using wide cuttings in soil or vermiculite or narrow cuttings in vermiculite.

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Gerald Klingaman and G.L. Wheeler

In 1993, the Arkansas poultry industry produced 1.048 billion broilers with a total live weight of 2.54 million metric tons. Depending on the type of processing used, from 30% to 50% of live weight can end up in the waste stream. Three primary waste-stream products are generated by the poultry industry: feather meal, poultry meal, and bone meal. Feather meal contains ≈14% N, poultry meal 11% N, and bone meal 8% N. Byproduct additions were made to tomato, marigold, and impatiens transplants at the rate of 6, 12, 24 and 48 g/10-cm pot. The two highest rates killed plants outright, while the lower rates resulted in some growth reduction when compared to the control. Studies are under way to further evaluate the use of these byproducts in an organic production system for tomatoes and bedding plants.

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Gerald L. Klingaman and G. Laurin Wheeler

Twelve to 15 year old silver maple and wild cherry trees were top pruned severely to a height of 5m and then trunk injected with Prunit 20g/l at 0, 0.1, 0.5 or 1.0 g/inch of trunk diameter or were treated with a trunk pour of Prunit 50W at the rate of 0, 0.5 or 1.0 g/inch of trunk diameter. Treatment effects were not obvious on any trees until 12 months after treatment. After 36 months maples receiving the two highest rates had made less than 50 cm of growth above the pruned top of the tree whereas the untreated control had produced 3 m of new shoot growth. The 0.1 g rate produced less aesthetic disruption to the appearance of the tree and reduced growth to 1.2 m. Wild cherry trees responded similarly but the amount of regrowth following pruning was less. Maple trees receiving the trunk pour treatment exhibited a 50% reduction in new shoot growth 36 months after treatment.

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Gerald L. Klingaman and G. Laurin Wheeler

Twelve to 15 year old silver maple and wild cherry trees were top pruned severely to a height of 5m and then trunk injected with Prunit 20g/l at 0, 0.1, 0.5 or 1.0 g/inch of trunk diameter or were treated with a trunk pour of Prunit 50W at the rate of 0, 0.5 or 1.0 g/inch of trunk diameter. Treatment effects were not obvious on any trees until 12 months after treatment. After 36 months maples receiving the two highest rates had made less than 50 cm of growth above the pruned top of the tree whereas the untreated control had produced 3 m of new shoot growth. The 0.1 g rate produced less aesthetic disruption to the appearance of the tree and reduced growth to 1.2 m. Wild cherry trees responded similarly but the amount of regrowth following pruning was less. Maple trees receiving the trunk pour treatment exhibited a 50% reduction in new shoot growth 36 months after treatment.

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T. Scott Starr and Gerald L. Klingaman

Two impact sprinklers, a traditional round-patterned design (Rain Bird Maxi-Bird) and a newly developed square-patterned design (Square Shooter) were tested under field conditions to compare the uniformity of their precipitation patterns. The Square Shooter sprinkler requires half as many sprinkler heads as the Rain Bird to cover the same area with head-to-head coverage. The Square Shooter sprinkler, with a coefficient of variation of 0.124, produced a more-uniform distribution of precipitation than the Rain Bird sprinkler, with a coefficient of variation of 0.215. Square Shooter also delivered water more accurately within the boundaries of the plot than Rain Bird, which had more of the total precipitation falling outside the plot area than Square Shooter. The new square-patterned design could allow installation of heads on only one edge of an area with the same, or better, uniformity of coverage as traditional perimeter installations.

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Jon T. Lindstrom, James A. Robbins, Gerald L. Klingaman, Scott Starr and Janet Carson

The University of Arkansas established a new, replicated, woody ornamental plant evaluation program in 1999. Three sites were used across the state and these sites encompassed the three different USDA Plant Cold Hardiness Zones found in Arkansas, Zones 6, 7 and 8. In the first year, 17 different woody ornamental plants were established in the evaluation. Information obtained from performance in this evaluation will be used in Arkansas Select, a marketing program for customers and nurserymen in the state. Nonpatented and nontrademarked plant material will be made available for propagation purposes. Woody plants will be evaluated for 5 years and herbaceous perennials will be evaluated for 3 years.

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James N. Moore, Roy C. Rom, Stanley A. Brown and Gerald L. Klingaman

Three ornamental peaches and one ornamental nectarine were released in 1992 from the Arkansas peach breeding program. `Tom Thumb' is a red-leaf dwarf peach with attractive foliage that is retained throughout summer. `Leprechaun' is a green-leaf dwarf nectarine with small but attractive, freestone fruits. `Crimson Cascade' and `Pink Cascade' are red-leaf peaches with trees of standard size that exhibit a weeping growth habit. `Crimson Cascade' produces double flowers that are dark red while `Pink Cascade' double flowers are pink. The attractive plants of these cultivars should be of value in home landscapes.

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James N. Moore, Roy C. Rom, Stanley A. Brown and Gerald L. Klingaman

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Richelle A. Sink, Alfred E. Einert, Gerald L. Klingaman and Ronald W. McNew

Euonymous fortunei `Coloratus' (Turcz.) Hand.-Mazz. (purpleleaf wintercreeper euonymus) is a groundcover species commonly grown in the landscape and known for its characteristic purplish-red color in the fall. This species is dimorphic, having both juvenile and adult forms present in established plants. Young plants, planted from 5.7-cm containers, were grown under full sun and 60% shade and evaluated for 1 year from May 1998. Four fertilizer treatments, up to four applications, were applied over the year. Data collected included the percent of adult and juvenile plants per plot, percent canopy cover, plant quality, and fresh and dry weights of pruned plant material and whole plants. Results showed that 73% of Euonymus planted in the shade were “adult-like” in form, while only 44% of Euonymus planted in the sun were “adult-like” in form. These results were analyzed with the percentage canopy cover determined for March, April, and May 1999 and showed no interaction of the two variables. By the end of the study, the mean percent of canopy cover was 77% under the shade and 74% under the sun. These values were not significantly different. While it appeared that the maturity of the plant did not effect the percent of groundcover coverage in a plot, the more mature or “adult-like” plants were visually undesirable within a plot of juvenile plants, and vice versa due to morphological differences.