Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: George L. Good x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Jae H. Han, George L. Good*, and Harold M. Van Es

Field experiments were conducted in 1998 and 1999 to determine the effect of soil-incorporated, composted municipal biosolids on the growth and nutrient content of 30.8 cm-38.5 cm Rhododendron × `PJM' grown as containerized plants. Biosolid compost produced in Endicott, N.Y., was incorporated in May 1998 and 1999 at rates of 0, 9.8 Mg/ha and 19.7 megag/ha to a depth of 23 cm. Each treatment was replicated six times in a randomized block design. Plants were planted 10 June 1998 and 8 June 1999. Plants were harvested 10 June, 19 Aug., and 22 Oct. 1998 and 8 June and 22 Sept.1999 after which they were dried, weighed, and analyzed. During 1998, there was little difference in dry weight or nutrient content in plants harvested at the August harvest date, however, dry weight and most nutrient levels increased with increasing rates of compost application in plants harvested at the October harvest date. In 1999, no statistical differences were noted at the September harvest date in plant dry weight or nutrient content. In 1999, measured soil physical properties (water retention, bulk density, water content, and soil strength) did not differ significantly between treatments. Excellent soil structure and drainage, relatively low rates of compost application and a severe drought may have contributed to the lack of any conclusive results noted in 1999 though some positive plant responses to the treatments were evident in 1998.

Free access

Kenneth W. Mudge, Joseph P. Lardner, Howard K. Mahoney, and George L. Good

Free access

Jae H. Han, George L. Good, Eric B. Nelson, and Harold M. Van Es

Composts vary in their ability to suppress disease activity when incorporated into growing media. Bioassays that enable a reliable and quick assessment of compost's ability to suppress disease activity can save time, funds and space. A bioassay using Lupinu× `Russell Hybrid' seedlings was evaluated as a short-term test for gauging the ability of three composts to suppress activity of P. cinnamomi. Colonized millet seeds were prepared via the V-8 agar method. The colonized millet seed were incorporated into the potting media at 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 colonized millet seed/200 cc of the media used. Three composts, including composted sewage sludge, brewer's waste and cow manure, were incorporated into the media (50% sand: 50% sphagnum peat, by volume) at rates of 0%, 10%, 25%, and 50%, by volume. The media, including the inoculated millet seed, were placed in small plastic pots (7.6-cm-diameter and 6.7 cm high), after which 10 Lupine seeds were sowed in each pot. Percentage of seedling loss was determined after 43 days of observation. The composted sewage sludge and the cow manure proved suppressive at the 50% incorporation rate and the 10% and 25% rate of the latter compost. The brewer's waste compost proved ineffective in this regard; thus, research with this product was discontinued. In a greenhouse study the same inoculation and compost incorporation rates were used, but rooted cuttings of Rhododendro × PJM `Elite' were plotted into the various treatments. Suppression of disease activity by the composts was significant 2 and 4 months after initiation of treatments. Significance in disease suppression noted between these treatments decreased significantly during the fifth month of the experiment.

Free access

Jae H. Han, George L. Good, Eric B. Nelson, and Harold M. Van Es

Composted municipal biosolids were incorporated into a potting mix containing sphagnum peat and sand (1:1 by volume) at rates of 0%, 25%, and 50%, by volume. A second medium was prepared by mixing cow manure compost in the same basic mix at rates of 0%, 10%, and 25% by volume. Each mix was inoculated with P. cinnamomi colonized millet seed at a rate of 200/200 cc of compost-amended media. The potted plants were placed outdoors under nursery conditions 14 July 2003. One half of the plants were irrigated every day, except when natural precipitation occurred; the other half was watered once each week. Soil water potential of all treatments was measured daily with tensiometers. Plants were harvested on 18 Aug. and 21 Oct. 2003, when the experiment was terminated. Frequent rainfall during the period prior to the first harvest masked any impact that the irrigation treatments may have had on disease suppression. Even so, three compost treatments proved successful in suppressing disease activity. Between the first and second harvest dates rainfall was significantly less frequent; thus, differences in P. cinnamomi activity between the wet and dry regimes was noted at the 21 Oct. harvest. Under the dry regime, all inoculated compost treatments, except the 25% municipal biosolid compost, exhibited disease suppression based on root symptom severity and percentage of root infection. Suppression based on shoot symptoms and percentage of shoot loss was evident only in the 50% and 25% biosolid and cow manure composts, respectively. Under the wet regime, only one treatment exhibited suppression of disease activity. All compost treatments held more water particularly at lower moisture tensions. The presence of more water would tend to favor more disease activity and not suppression.

Free access

Paul D. Curtis, Elizabeth D. Rowland, Meena M. Harribal, Gwen B. Curtis, J. Alan Renwick, Mathew D. Martin-Rehrmann, and George L. Good

Many plants have mechanisms of physical or chemical resistance that protect them from herbivores in their environment. The ornamental plant Pachysandra terminalis Sieb. and Zucc is highly unpalatable to voles, but the nature of this resistance is not fully understood. Extracts of P. terminalis were prepared to determine the extent to which chemical constituents could account for its avoidance by voles. A bioassay in which samples were mixed with applesauce showed that ethanolic extracts were highly deterrent to captive prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster Wagner, 1842). Bioassay-guided fractionation of ethanol extracts showed that antifeedant activity was present in both polar and non-polar fractions. Further separation of each fraction by open column chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography revealed that combinations of compounds were responsible for the deterrent activity. Preliminary ultraviolet and mass spectroscopic analyses indicated that steroidal alkaloids that are characteristic of this plant are likely to be involved.