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M.L. Arpaia, G.S. Bender, and G.W. Witney

A project evaluating the performance of cv. Hass on eight clonal avocado rootstocks—G755A, G755B, G755C, Duke 7 (D7), Borchard (BR), D9, Toro Canyon, and Topa Topa was established in southern California in 1986. Two additional rootstocks, Thomas and G1033, were added in 1987. Of the trees planted in 1986, the BR and D7 rootstocks have consistently had the highest total yields for all rootstocks, whereas the three G755 selections have had the lowest productivity. No differences in productivity between the two rootstocks planted in 1987 have been detected. The influence of rootstock on the magnitude of alternate bearing will be discussed, although the oscillation in yield is greater for the higher-yielding rootstocks. Tree size has been measured throughout the study. The BR selection has consistently produced a larger tree, even though it has continued to have high productivity. There are no consistent differences between the other rootstocks. Yield efficiency, measured as the kg fruit/m3 of canopy volume has been calculated. In selections that are prone to severe alternate bearing, the swing in yield efficiency is also the greatest. The data thus far suggests that a yield efficiency of ≈2.5 kg fruit/m3 canopy volume is the maximum yield possible for California `Hass' avocado.

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X. Liu, P. Robinson, M.L. Arpaia, and G.W. Witney

Monthly samples were taken from 9-year-old `Hass' avocado trees on Duke 7 rootstock grown at the UC Southcoast Research and Extension Center in Irvine, Calif. Changes in starch and total soluble sugars were monitored from fine and coarse roots, trunk (above the bud union), small diameter stems, leaves, and fruit. When possible, seasonal carbohydrate changes were compared to root and shoot flushing patterns. In all of the vegetative plant organs monitored, total soluble sugars accounted for most of the carbohydrate. Starch accounted for ≈10% of the sample dry weight, whereas the total soluble sugars accounted for ≈18%. D-mannoheptulose and perseitol, both C7 sugars, were the predominant soluble sugars throughout the year. Fructose, glucose, and sucrose accounted for <5% of the total soluble sugars. During fruit development, soluble sugar content of the exo- and mesocarp tissues >25% of the dry weight. The significance of these findings will be discussed in relationship to tree phenology and carbohydrate partitioning.

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D. E. Stottlemyer, M. L. Arpaia, J. L. Meyer, G. W. Witney, and G. S. Bender

The influence of three irrigation treatments on flowering, yield, tree growth, root distribution, and leaf analysis of mature `Hass' avocado (Persea americana Mill.) was investigated over a six year period (1987-1992). Three irrigation treatments; 60, 80, and 100% of evapotranspiration (ETc) were applied using low-volume spray emitters. The differential irrigation treatments were maintained year round. Irrigation treatments did not affect the timing or intensity of bloom. Yield data from years 2-6 show a significant irrigation effect on cumulative weight and total number of fruit per tree. Trees receiving 100% ETc had higher yield/tree. This increased yield was due both to increased fruit numbers and individual fruit weight per tree. Tree growth was also significantly impacted by the irrigation treatments. Trees receiving 100% ETc exhibited the greatest amount of vegetative growth over the study. Yield efficiency (Kg fruit/m3 canopy) was not influenced by irrigation treatment. Irrigation treatment did not significantly influence nutrient analysis taken in the fall of each year.