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  • Author or Editor: G. M. Weaver x
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Abstract

The synthesis of improved fruit varieties is largely dependent on three main factors: 1) the calibre of the raw material or the gene resources; 2) the quality of the tools used in choosing parents, hybridization and progeny selection; and 3) the human element and such qualities as perception or at least a capacity for keen observation. The degree of success achieved by any plant breeder is obviously influenced to a considerable extent by his resourcefulness in enlarging upon his gene resources, and the use of the most efficient breeding tools further enhances the program.

Open Access

Abstract

Peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) at 1157 and 868 trees per ha and trained as either palmette or hedgerow produced nearly twice as much fruit in the first 5 years as did trees trained to a modified central leader at 397 trees per ha at Jordan Station, Ontario, Canada. In addition to dormant pruning to shape the trees and restrict their size, the palmette and hedgerow plantings were pruned each year in midsummer when about half of the current year's growth was removed. Insects and mites were no greater problem, and brown rot was significantly less in the high- than in the low-density planting.

Open Access

Abstract

An 8-year study was made to assess the performance of Harrow Blood and Siberian C rootstock seedlings in comparison with the commercial seedling rootstocks Rutgers Red Leaf, Veteran, Halford and Bailey. Rootstocks significantly influenced tree size of ‘Loring’, ‘Redhaven’ and ‘Babygold 5’ peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch). Siberian C had the largest influence on size control, reducing tree volume by about 20%. Tree height and spread, trunk circumference and trunk cross-sectional areas were also influenced by rootstocks, but annual growth of terminal shoots was not. Rootstocks influenced crotch angle development of ‘Loring’, but had no effect on crotch angle development of ‘Redhaven’ or ‘Babygold 5’. Cropping efficiency of ‘Babygold 5’ was influenced by rootstocks but cropping efficiency of ‘Redhaven’ and ‘Loring’ were not. Yields were significantly influenced by rootstocks. The highest cumulative yields of ‘Loring’ were on Veteran seedlings, the highest of ‘Redhaven’ were on Rutgers Red Leaf and the highest of ‘Babygold 5’ were on Halford. Yields were also a function of tree size with the highest yields being obtained on the largest trees. Trunk circumference and crosssectional area were the only growth measurements that were significantly correlated with the yield of each cultivar. Tree survival was best on Harrow Blood and Siberian C and poorest on Rutgers Red Leaf and Veteran. Tree mortality was associated with winter injury and canker (Leucostoma spp.) infection but not with incompatibility.

Open Access