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  • Author or Editor: G. Jay Gogue x
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Abstract

Currently there seems to be a trend throughout this country’s academic institutions for courses and curricula to become “more relevant,” “more applicable,” or “more practical.” Hopefully this will be a cyclic phenomenon and with some luck this training episode will end and institutions will be able to pursue educational concepts again. My concern is that horticulture appears to be so involved in training that the professional quality of some of our graduates has deteriorated. My intention is not to deny that applied ideas and concepts are of major importance to horticulture, but to emphasize that basic scientific principles are equally important and in my judgment actually more practical over the duration of an individual’s professional career.

Open Access

Abstract

Boron ranging from 13 to 800 ppm was applied (100 ml per 15 cm pot) to the media of the Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. cvs. Improved Albatross and CF No. 2 Good News. Seasonal variation was observed in injury time and foliar toxic levels. Boron toxicity symptoms were observed at foliar levels of 136 ppm in ‘Improved Albatross’ and 350 ppm in ‘CF No. 2 Good News’ 4 days after B application in an April to May experiment, while 7 to 28 days were required to produce symptoms at foliar levels of 158 ppm in ‘Improved Albatross’ and 144 ppm in ‘CF No. 2 Good News’ in a December to March experiment. Stem length and flower diameter decreased with increases in B concentration applied. Foliar B levels exceeding 100 ppm reduced growth.

Open Access

Abstract

Foliar analysis data (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Zn, Mn, Fe, Cu, and B) and growth parameters (flower diameter and dry weight and flowering stem weight and length) indicated that municipal compost could be used as a soil amendment for chrysanthemum culture. Compost amendment produced plants high in foliar K, Cu, B, and Zn. A marginal leaf injury was observed in compost-grown plants. While K, Cu, and Zn toxicities were disproven, B toxicity still remained a possible explanation for the symptoms. Plants grown in perlite media were high in K, Ca, Cu, Al, B, and Zn, and perlite amendment may have accented the leaf injury observed in compost media. Negative correlations of growth parameters occurred with foliar K, Cu, Al, B, Na, and Zn concentrations.

Open Access

Abstract

Chrysanthemum morifolium (Ramat.) cultivars showed a range of stem girdling responses when treated with the chemical pinching agents, a commercial pinching agent (OSO) and methyl decanoate (MD). Differential responses were attributed to the number of trichomes per unit area of the stem; resistant cultivars had more trichomes than susceptible cultivars. The stomatal number per unit of stem area was constant for all cultivars. Stem diameter was not a significant factor in the susceptibility of cultivars to girdling damage. Resistance was eliminated by damaging or removing the trichomes of a resistant cultivar. Similar treatment of a susceptible cultivar did not increase susceptibility. Susceptible cultivars absorbed more 14C MD than resistant ones. Injury was positively correlated with 14C MD uptake within cultivars. Methyl decanote did not enter the stem through epidermal cells adjacent to trichomes or the trichome itself, but rather through epidermal cells not in proximity of the trichomes.

Open Access

Abstract

A technique was developed which permits observations of a single rose petal segment through the stero-light microscope (SLM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and light microscope (LM). The procedure consisted of viewing the fresh tissue with SLM, fixing and post-fixing in glutaraldehyde and osmium, respectively, and dehydrating in ethanol. The alcohol in the tissue was subsequently replaced with increasing concentrations of iso-amyl acetate, the tissue critical point dried, coated with C, and viewed in the SEM. The tissue was removed from the SEM mounting stub, pressure embedded in epoxy resin at 28 kg/sq cm (400 psi), polymerized, sectioned, stained, and viewed with both the TEM and LM. The technique of pressure embedding samples in epoxy resin eliminated the problem of rehydration and subsequent dehydration of tissue following SEM observation. Furthermore, this new technique reduced the time required for observation with multiple microscopic optical systems, while still offering latitude in the time between the various steps which has been a drawback in previous techniques.

Open Access