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  • Author or Editor: G. H. Oberly x
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Abstract

Spraying ‘Northern Spy’ apple trees with 50 ppm TIBA 2 weeks after petal fall reduced the accumulation of Ca in the fruit and increased the amount of bitter pit. The greatest incidence of bitter pit was associated with the Ca content of the fruit during the middle of the growing season. Calcium accumulated rapidly during the period of cell division and seed development, and again 2 to 3 weeks before harvest. The late influx of Ca may explain the development of less bitter pit in storage in late harvested apples than in apples harvested immature.

Open Access

Abstract

Analyses were made of Ca and Mg in a consecution of annual rings of 3 mature ‘McIntosh’ apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) orchard blocks in New York (acid rain region) and also 3 mature ‘McIntosh’ blocks in British Columbia (arid-irrigated region) in an attempt to assess the long range effects of acid rain on Ca levels in apple trees. Differences in patterns of Ca and Mg deposition in the wood did not appear to be caused by acid rain.

Open Access

Abstract

The nutrient element composition of mid-shoot leaves of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was influenced by different N sources. Leaf N was significantly higher with applications of (NH4)2SO4 than with the 6 other carriers at the 3 sampling dates, and was significantly lower with ureaform at the first and second sampling date. The N source has little influence on Mg, Zn, Mn, or Fe leaf level at the June sampling date, but caused significant variation of these elements in the July and August samples. There was significant variation in leaf levels of Cu, B, Mo, Al, and Na at the 3 sampling dates.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Significant differences were evident in levels of Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn, and Na in leaves of ‘McIntosh’ apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) scions grafted on 16 different rootstocks when sampled over a 4-year period. Trees on Malling-Merton (MM) 106 rootstock were among the highest in leaf Mg and Ca, while those on Mailing (M) 4 were among the lowest in leaf Mg, Ca, Na, and Al.

Open Access

Natural and 10B-enriched boric acid solutions were sprayed on whole trees or certain parts of `Reliance' peach trees (Prunus persica L. Batsch) to estimate the uptake and translocation of B. The tissues were analyzed for total B and 10B: 11B ratio. The single or multiple spray treatments of 233 mg B/liter applied at full bloom (FB), FB + 2 weeks, and FB = 4 weeks did not increase B concentrations in leaves or stems collected 45,75, and 105 days following FB. Individual limbs sprayed with 0,200,400,600, or 1200 mg B/liter did not affect B concentrations in six aerial plant parts harvested 3 days following treatment. Boron uptake and translocation were also studied by applying 30 μl of 600 mg B/liter from 10B-enriched boric acid as spot treatments to various peach plant parts. Leaves, stems, and fruit absorbed 10B and translocated it to nontreated tissues. However, only a small amount of 10B was absorbed by 3 days after treatment.

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