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  • Author or Editor: G. H. Carter x
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Abstract

Ripening of ‘Early Italian’ prunes, harvested at maturity suitable for fresh shipment, was enhanced by several days exposure to low temperature (1°C). Cold treated prunes developed more color, less acidity and were softer than prunes ripened immediately at 21°. No changes in these characteristics occurred during the cold period. Canned whole fruit and juice reflected these changes and were readily detected by a taste panel.

Open Access

Abstract

Gibberellic acid (GA), applied at 10 to 30 ppm early in stage III of fruit growth, resulted in canned sweet cherries, cv. Rainier, that were a clear golden color with nearly clear syrup, and were firmer and larger than untreated fruit. The differences appeared to be due more to a change in fruit characteristics than to a simple delay in maturity.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Rival’ a new cultivar of apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) developed for the Pacific Northwest, if peeled, produces a processed product that is equal to, or superior to ‘Tilton’, a standard canning cultivar, in shear values, succulometer values, Vitamin C content, objective and sensory color, flavor, and texture.

Open Access

Abstract

Factors determined to have a pronounced effect on shear-press peak-force values of asparagus, Asparagus officinalis L. included sample size, spear diameter, length of green, and preharvest temperature. Shear-press values were greater following periods of cold weather in early spring. Larger diameter spears had lower peak-force values than smaller spears, indicating that larger spears are more tender than smaller spears. The number and diameter of spears produced by a particular cultivar, and not differences between cultivars, were the characteristics observed to influence shear-press values. Shear-press max peak-force values correlated well with subjective and objective determinations of asparagus fiber.

Open Access

Abstract

Gibberellic acid (GA) applied at 20 ppm 4−6 weeks before harvest increased the ascorbic acid content of fresh and processed ‘Rainier’ cherries (Prunus avium L.) while also increasing fruit size and yellow color. Anthocyanin content was also reduced. GA treated fruit rated higher according to USDA processed fruit grades. Ascorbic acid content did not change with maturity. There was no interaction between GA and maturity on ascorbic acid content (2-Chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon), applied at 500 ppm 1 to 3 weeks before harvest, reduced fruit size compared with untreated fruit. Fruit treated with succinic acid-2,2-dimethylhydrazide (daminozide) at 2000 ppm 2 weeks after full bloom reduced the weight per fruit after processing but not before processing. This was reflected in a greater loss in drained weight. Daminozide increased anthocyanin content and reduced yellow and green color of fresh fruit.

Open Access