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Fouad M. Basiouny

Malonic acid, 3(3,4 dichlorophenyl)–1, 1 dimethyurea, Gibberellic acid, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxypropionic acid were applied to muscadine grapes (Vitis rotundifolia Michx) during maturation and ripening. Total soluble solids, sugars, anthocyanin contents, and other fruit qualities were affected. 3(3,4 dichlorophenyl)–1, 1 dimethylurea (diuron) seemed to induce better and different effects than the other chemicals.

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Fouad M Basiouny

Postharvest waste constitutes major problems in developing countries and usually results in significant waste of produce valued in the millions of dollars. Lack of disease control, proper fertilization, irrigation and improper cultural practices during the growing season followed by faulty handling methods during and after harvest are different factors contributing to poor quality, short shelf-life, and fast deterioration of the produce. In spite of the utilization of advanced technologies, postharvest loss in developing nations may range from 20% to 80%, depending on the commodity and the producing country. Due to the magnitude of the problem, serious efforts must be directed to improve production and reduce postharvest waste in nonindustrialized nations.

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Fouad M. Basiouny

Kiwifruits at 3 stages of ripening were stored at 3°C for 4 weeks to study the effect of cold storage on ethylene production and fruit quality. Samples taken weekly were analyzed for firmness, TSS, acidity, tissue chlorophyll and carbohydrate contents. Fruits at early stage of ripening (hard) produced less ethylene than fruits at late ripening stage (soft). Fruit quality attributes vary significantly among the different ripening stages and storage intervals.

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Fouad M. Basiouny

Fruit of Rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashie Reade cv. `Tifblue') were hand-picked at horticultural maturity and received postharvest liquid coating and heat treatments at 37.7°C for 30 minutes. After precooling for 2 hours and subjected to the treatments, fruit were placed in ventilated card boxes and stored at 1 ± 2°C and 90% to 95% relative humidity for 4 weeks. Heat, liquid coating, or both benefited fruit by reducing storage moisture loss and prolonging fruit shelf life compared to nontreated fruit. However, combining liquid coating with heat treatment did not result in higher differences in storability or fruit quality characteristics.

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Fouad M. Basiouny

Blueberry fruits (Vaccinium ashie Read) of two cultivars, `Delite' and `Woodard', were hand-picked twice during the growing season (15 June and 1 July) to study the benefits of UV-B irradiance on postharvest fruit quality. After precooling, healthy, disease-free, uniform fruits were selected and exposed to UV-B irradiance (180 to 310 nm) for 24 h under cold conditions. The fruits were then kept at 2–3 °C and 90% to 95% relative humidity for 2 weeks before determining their quality parameters. Irradiated fruits were softer, wrinkled, and non-marketable compared to non-irradiated berries. UV-B had no beneficial effects on fruit quality or storability.

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Fouad M. Basiouny and Floyde M. Woods

Applications of paclobutrazol (PP333), Daminozide (DZ), and Nutri-cal to rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashi Reade) was studied. The application of these chemicals at different concentrations was made in the fall and throughout the growing season. PP333, DZ and Nutri-cal induced variable effects on yield, inte rnal and external fruit qualities. Shelf-life of hand-harvested fruits responded favorably to each of these chemicals.

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Abdullah Al-Solaiman and Fouad M. Basiouny

Mango fruits (Mangifera indica L. cv. Tommy Atkins) were harvested at early physiological maturity to study the effects of postharvest treatments on storage and fruit shelf-life. The fruits were subjected to control atmosphere (20 CO2 +3% O2, and 30% CO2 + 3% O2), liquid coating (NatureSeal and Polyamine), and ethanol vapor. The fruits were kept for 4 weeks at 50 + 3°F then removed from the cold storage and maintained at room temperature. Mango fruits stored at high level of CO2 or dipped in NatureSeal had better shelf-life than fruits stored at a low level of CO2 or with ethanol vapor.