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  • Author or Editor: Filmore Meredith x
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The fruit of 6 highbush cultivars and 8 rabbiteye cultivars and selections were evaluated by HPLC for levels and partitioning of the commonly found organic acids, citric, malic, succinic, and quinic. The two cultivar groups possessed distinctive acid partitioning patterns which could unambiguously separate rabbiteye and highbush clones. Highbush material was characterized by high citric acid, with percentages averaging 75% (range 38 to 90%), and succinic acid the next most plentiful acid, averaging 17%. In contrast, rabbiteye cultivars averaged 10% citric acid, and no clone had more than 22%. Succinic acid and malic acid were found in greater quantities than in highbush, averaging 50% and 34% respectively. Analysis of the fruit of 7 albino highbush selections exhibited a profile similar to standard highbush material, but with citric acid reduced to an average of 50%, and the proportional increase in other acids distributed between succinic and quinic acids.

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Abstract

‘Redblush’ grapefruit borne on young fruiting trees and grafted on sour orange seedlings were exposed to natural and artificial climates. Fruit exposed to artificially controlled and naturally occurring minimum night temperatures above 70°F, combined with high day temperatures, had high Brix contents, low acid, and thin but green peels. Fruit exposed to minimum night temperatures below 60°, combined with moderate to cool day temperatures had both high Brix and acid and thicker but better colored peels. Cool temperatures in the late fall after hot summer and early fall conditions aided in thickening and coloring of peels of fruit which had already attained high Brix and early maturity.

Open Access

Abstract

The flesh of ‘Redblush’ grapefruit exposed to 41.8°C day/36.1°C night temperatures in environmental growth chambers for 60 days did not increase in lycopene content, while fruit exposed to natural conditions in sunlight and under shade did. Lowering the temperature from 41.8°C/36.1°C to 32.2°C/21.1°C produce a high level of lycopene. Carotene concns. of fruit exposed to 41.8°C/36.1°C and natural conditions remained the same. Exposure to 32.2°C/21.1°C caused a small increase in carotene, while exposure to natural conditions, at lower temperatures, caused a larger increase in carotene.

Open Access

The fruit of six highbush (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cultivars and eight rabbiteye (V. ashei Reade) cultivars and selections were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography for levels of the commonly found organic acids, citric, malic, succinic, and quinic. The two cultivar groups possessed distinctive patterns of relative organic acid proportions that could unambiguously separate pure rabbiteye and highbush clones in a principal component analysis. Highbush clones were characterized by high citric acid content, with percentages averaging 75% (range 38% to 90%). Succinic acid was the second most plentiful acid, averaging 17%. In contrast, rabbiteye cultivars and selections contained 10% citric acid, and no clone had >22%. Succinic acid and malic acid were found in greater quantities than in highbush, averaging 50% and 34%, respectively. Analysis of the fruit of seven albino-fruited highbush selections exhibited a profile similar to standard highbush cultivars, but with a citric acid average of <50%, and proportionally greater amounts of succinic and quinic acids. Given the differences in sensory quality of these four acids, it is likely that acid partitioning patterns can largely account for some of the perceived flavor differences between rabbiteye and highbush blueberries. Because several current breeding efforts involve hybridization between highbush and rabbiteye blueberries, a consideration of acid composition of breeding parents maybe worthwhile.

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