Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Fatma Yilmaz x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Umit Serdar, Bulent Kose, and Fatma Yilmaz

We studied the anatomical structure of graft unions in European chestnut using several grafting methods. The work was done in the greenhouse during 2003–04. The grafting methods epicotyl, hypocotyl, and inverted radicle were used. The grafts were made with scions of clone SA 5-1 on clone SE 21-9 rootstock. The samples for examination were taken from the graft unions 2, 6, and 12 months after grafting, and fixed in a formalin–acetic acid–alcohol solution. The observation of the anatomical structure of the graft union area revealed that new cambium, xylem, and phloem tissues were formed in the samples two months after grafting. Further, it could be also observed that 6 months were necessary for continuous cambial connection.

Free access

Adnan Nurhan Yildirim, Fatma Akinci-Yildirim, Mehmet Polat, Bekir Şan, and Yılmaz Sesli

Amygdalin is a bioactive compound used in the traditional treatment of some diseases, and it is toxic to humans and animals when it is consumed excessively. It is abundantly found in the kernels of almond cultivars, especially in bitter ones. In the study, the amygdalin contents of the kernels of 15 commercial almond cultivars (Prunus amygdalus L.) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for 2 consecutive years. The seeds of the cultivars were obtained from the Fruit Research Institute, Isparta, Turkey. Results indicated that amygdalin concentrations of the cultivars were significantly different (P < 0.05) for 2 years. The levels amygdalin ranged from 0.443 g·kg–1 to 1.866 g·kg–1 in 2008 and from 0.250 g·kg–1 to 2.200 g·kg–1 in 2009. As the average of 2 years, the highest concentration of amygdalin was determined in ‘Supernova’ (1.458 g·kg–1) and the lowest concentration was determined in ‘Masbovera’ (0.370 g·kg–1).