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  • Author or Editor: F.M. del Amor x
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F.M. del Amor, V. Martinez and A. Cerdá

The shortage of good quality water in semiarid zones necessitates the use of saline water for irrigation. In order to simulate the usage of brackish irrigation water in greenhouse melon (Cucumis melo L. cv. Galia) culture in perlite, plants were supplied with nutrient solutions containing 0 (control), 20, 40, and 60 mm NaCl applied at four different times. Treatments were applied during early vegetative growth [14 days after transplanting (DAT)], beginning of flowering (37 DAT), beginning of fruit set (56 DAT), and beginning of fruit ripening (71 DAT). All vegetative and fruit yield parameters were significantly reduced when salinization was started 14 DAT. This inhibitory effect of salinity was progressively lessened when salinity was imposed at later dates. This suggests that the response of melons to salinity depends on the duration of exposure to saline water. Salinity treatments increased fruit reducing sugars, acidity, and total soluble solids. Fruit yield reduction at each salinization time was correlated with salinity levels, but there was some evidence of a nutrient imbalance, since leaf concentrations of N-NO3, and especially K, were low at higher salinities. These results indicate that brackish waters can be used for growing melon with minimum yield losses if concentration and duration of exposure are carefully monitored.

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F.M. del Amor, V. Martinez and A. Cerdá

In order to simulate the usage of brackish irrigation water in greenhouse tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill. cv. Daniela) culture in perlite, plants were supplied with nutrient solutions containing 0, 20, 40, and 60 mm NaCl. The three highest salinity treatments were applied at three different plant growth stages, during early vegetative growth [16 days after transplanting, (DAT)], beginning of flowering (36 DAT), and starting fruit development (66 DAT). Salt tolerance of tomato plants increased when the application of salinity was delayed. Salinity significantly decreased size and number of marketable fruits, but increased fruit quality by increasing total soluble solids and sugar content. Leaf and fruit calcium and potassium concentrations were decreased significantly by increasing salinity levels. This was compensated for the accumulation of sodium. Anion accumulation was increased by increasing chloride concentration. These results indicate that it is feasible to use brackish water for growing tomato with minimum yield losses if salt concentration and duration of exposure are carefully monitored.