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  • Author or Editor: F. W. Moeller x
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Abstract

The Mugo or Swiss mountain pine is one of the most popular evergreen shrubs for modem landscaping. Mugo pines include the type species (sometimes referred to as var. mugo or var. mughus) and 3 additional geographical varieties pumilio (Haenke) Zenari, rostrata (Ant.) Gord., and rotunda (Link) Gord. (1, 8). The most desirable dwarf forms for landscape use are derived from p. mugo var. pumilio. The other 2 botanical varieties are usually of arboreal size.

Open Access

Abstract

Harvest date, bulb weight, and the number of scale and leaf primordia of the daughter axis of July-to-October-harvested bulbs of Lilium longiflorum Thunb. cvs. Croft, Ace and Nellie White were harvest maturity indices (HMI) evaluated as predictors of subsequent bulb responses to dormancy-removing and flower-forcing treatments. Higher HMI ratings associated with late harvest, e.g., increased bulb size and increased numbers of daughter leaf primordia, favored early shoot emergence and flowering with standard forcing programs. However, early-harvested bulbs with lower HMI ratings could be forced with equal or superior quality when given modified forcing regimes. Early-harvested bulbs without cold treatment were more responsive to long day (LD) flower induction than late-harvested bulbs. The optimum dormancy-removing temperature was always 15°C, but the flower-inducing optimum tended to shift from 10° to 5° with progressively later harvest. However, 10° storage favored earlier emergence, greater leaf and flower numbers, while total days to flower from potting remained the same at the 2 inductive temperatures. The interaction of bulb maturity at harvest and forcing regime emphasize the necessity of tailoring the forcing regime to the HMI of the bulb.

Open Access