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  • Author or Editor: F. B. Abeles x
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Abstract

This report presents optimal harvest data equations (OHDE) calculated for 6 cultivars for apples at 3 locations in eastern West Virginia. In general, the equations predicted the observed harvest date one day better than the technique of using average calendar days for fruit development. The equations also indicated that bloom date was more important for determining the harvest date than the mean temperature during the growing season. Nonetheless, because of variability between equations, the overall usefulness of using the historical approach to the development of OHDE is limited.

Open Access
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Abstract

The activity of purported inhibitors of ethylene synthesis and ethylene action was tested in a lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. ‘Grand Rapids’) root growth model system. Ethylene production by lettuce seedlings was inhibited by three purported inhibitors of ACC-synthase: AOA, l-canaline (CAN), and AVG. However, except for AVG, these compounds did not increase root growth, suggesting that the endogenous basal rate of ethylene production did not play a role in controlling the growth of these seedling roots. The promotive effective of AVG on root growth was not due to an inhibition of ethylene production, since it retained its effect in the presence of externally supplied ethylene. Of the five purported inhibitors of ethylene action studied, only NBA and silver thiosulfate (STS) demonstrated anti-ethylene action without toxic side effects. Three other compounds reported to block ethylene action—CO2, DIHB, and MCEB—inhibited growth by themselves and failed to provide clear evidence that they blocked ethylene action in the lettuce root growth assay system. Chemical names used: 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC); (aminooxy)acetic acid (AOA); [S-(E)]-2-amino-4-(2-aminoethoxy)-3-butanoic acid (AVG); 2,5-norbornadiene (NBA); 3,5-diiodo-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (DIHB); and 5-methyl-7-chloro-4-ethoxycarbonylmethoxy-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (MCEB).

Open Access

Postharvest treatment with pyrrolnitrin (250 mg·liter-1) and low storage temperatures delay postharvest rot development in fall-harvested `Tribute' strawberries (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.). Untreated fruit stored at 18C developed gray mold fruit rot (Botrytis cinerea) and rhizopus rot (leak) by the second day. Fruit that did not develop gray mold or leak eventually developed blue mold rot (Penicillium spp.). No rot was observed at 1C, but gray mold and rhizopus rots developed after berries were transferred to 18C. Pyrrolnitrin delayed the appearance of the various rots by 2 to 4 days, but did not reduce the rate of rot development. Chemical name used: 3-chloro-4-(2'-nitro-3'-chlorophenyl)pyrrole (pyrrolnitrin).

Free access

Abstract

Over 100 years ago, German investigators reported that defoliation was associated with the proximity of leaking illuminating gas mains (15), and it remained for Neliubov to show that the active component of illuminating gas was ethylene (23). Later, La Rue (20) reported that auxin played a role in abscission because addition of auxin delayed the separation of plant parts. Support for the central role for auxin in abscission stems from the observation that a reduction of auxin content precedes abscission (22). Ethylene was shown to be produced by plant tissue by Gane (14), and increases in the rate of ethylene production during ripening and fruit abscission was shown by Nelson (24) and, during leaf abscission, by Jackson and Osborne (18). A third abscission regulator was introduced when Ohkuma and Addicott (25) demonstrated the presence of abscisic acid (ABA) in rapidly abscissing cotton bolls.

Open Access