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Eric Young

During natural leaf abscission, two-year-old, potted apple trees (Malus domestica cv. MM.111 EMLA) were placed in a cold room at 6C for chilling. At 0, 600, 900, and 1400 chilling hours (CH), ten trees were removed and terminal shoots cut into four 15 cm sections. These sections were randomly placed in forty 10 1 test tubes at 20C and subjected to ten oxygen levels from 0.5 to 21% O2 with four reps each by flushing tubes with mixtures of air and nitrogen prior to sealing. Tubes remained sealed for 4 hr then reflushed and resealed for another 4 hr after which 1 ml gas samples were drawn and CO2 and O2 levels measured on a gas chromatograph. Respiration decreased with oxygen level at all CH. CO2 evolved did not show a pattern related to oxygen level, but O2 consumed decreased at a decreasing rate with additional CH. Respiratory quotient was below one at 0 and 600 CH and equal to one at 900 and 1400 CH, indicating a possible shift in respiration substrate with chilling.

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Eric Young

Dormant apple trees (Malus domestics Borkh., cv. MM. 111) were chilled at SC for O, 500, 1000, or 1500 hours and then forced at 10, 20, or 30C for 21 days. Budbreak and root growth were recorded after forcing, and shoot and root respiration was measured at 5, 10, 20, and 30C to determine Q10 and energy of activation values. Budbreak, root growth, and respiration generally increased with chilling and forcing temperature. The Q10 of shoot respiration increased significantly with increasing chilling when measured before forcing; however, after forcing, Q10 decreased with chilling. Root respiration Q10 was not as influenced as shoot respiration by chilling either before or after forcing. Energy of activation for shoot and root respiration decreased significantly with chilling after forcing at each temperature.

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Eric Young

During natural leaf abscission, 2-year-old potted apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. MM.111 EMLA) were placed in a room at 6C for chilling [0,600, 900, or 1400 chilling units (CU)]. After each chilling treatment, respiration of shoot segments was measured as CO2 evolved and O2 consumed at 22C in several O2 concentrations. Respiration increased with oxygen concentration after all CU treatments. Carbon dioxide evolved at the several O2 levels did not show a pattern related to CU, but O2 consumed decreased at a decreasing rate with additional CU. Respiratory quotient was <1 at 0 and 600 CU and equal to 1 at 900 and 1400 CU, indicating a possible shift in respiratory substrate with chilling.

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Eric Young

Budbreak and root and shoot extension growth of apple trees (Malus domestics Borkh. MM.111) were affected by exposure to 500 hours of higher temperatures (15, 20, or 30C) during the first, second, or third 500 hours of a 1500-hour, 5C chilling period. Exposure to 15C during the third 500 hours had a significantly positive effect on budbreak, 20C at this time had no effect, and all other treatments had a negative effect on budbreak and new root and shoot growth.

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Michael Parker and Eric Young

Controlling vegetative growth resulting from a long growing season in the southeast is difficult while trying to promote early fruiting. This study was initiated in 1990 to evaluate higher density leader training techniques, cultivar interactions, and the benefits of pre-plant fumigation on apple replant sites. Another objective was to evaluate these management parameters in four regions with very different climates and elevations. The training techniques evaluated were, weak leader renewal, bending of the leader during the growing season, and partial terminal leaf removal every 10 inches of leader growth (without injuring the apical meristem). The cultivars used were Jonagored, Spur Gala, and Red Fuji, all on Mark rootstock. First and second year branching was not significantly different between the various training techniques. Yields during the third year did not appear to differ between the leader training techniques. Pre-plant fumigation appeared to be beneficial in increasing tree growth in only two of the four sites.

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Michael A. Arnold and Eric Young

CuCO3 at 100 g·liter-1 in a paint carrier applied to interior container surfaces effectively prevented root deformation in container-grown Malus domestica Borkh. and Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh. seedlings. CuCO3 treatments nearly doubled the number of white unsuberized root tips in both species. CuCO3 treatment increased some measures of root and shoot growth before and after transplanting to larger untreated containers. Root pruning at transplanting tended to reduce root and shoot fresh and dry matter accumulation in F. pennsylvanica seedlings and shoot extension in M. domestica seedlings. In some cases, root pruning of M. domestics at transplanting from CuCO3-treated containers increased root growth compared to unpruned CuCO3-treated and untreated seedlings. Changes in growth induced by CuCO3 and root pruning were not related to changes in trans -zeatin riboside-like activity in the xylem sap of-apple.

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Eric Young and S.M. Blankenship

Three percent oxygen significantly delayed and reduced budbreak of fully chilled apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) trees in a greenhouse. When ambient oxygen levels were restored, budbreak occurred normally. Apple trees stored under 3% ± 1% oxygen at 6C for 35 weeks had no detectable bud development in storage. Budbreak and subsequent shoot growth were normal after the trees had been removed from storage.

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David R. Ouellette and Eric Young

The ability of various leaf removal treatments or shoot tipping to induce lateral shoot development on current-season stoolbed shoots of MM.106 EMLA and M.26 EMLA apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) rootstocks was investigated. Removal of the five uppermost immature leaves or shoot tipping after every 20 to 25 cm of terminal growth produced more lateral budbreak than occurred on nontreated shoots. Shoot tipping resulted in the highest number of branches (≥5 cm) and greatest total branch length. Only tipping consistently induced lateral budbreak higher than 30 cm up the shoot. Removal of the 10 uppermost leaves and tipping resulted in the shortest terminal shoots. MM.106 shoots had more lateral budbreak, branches, and total branch length than did M.26 shoots.

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Robert D. Belding and Eric Young

Fruit from six cultivars of mature apple trees were evaluated for cuticular wax characteristics. Incidence of flyspeck, sooty blotch and russet was compared to the wax component of the cuticle. Three cultivars of Golden Delicious: Sundale Spur, Pure Gold, and Lys Golden; and three cultivars of Red Delicious: Starkspur Supreme, Oregon I, and Starkrimson, were examined.

Incidence of flyspeck on Golden Delicious apples was negatively correlated to cuticular wax per unit area. Sooty blotch appearance was greater on Golden Delicious fruit as compared to Red Delicious. Incidence of sooty blotch was positively correlated to cuticular wax weight per unit area among the cultivars of Red Delicious. Russeting was negatively correlated to wax weight per unit area for the Red Delicious cultivars. Wax compositional analysis will also be discussed.