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  • Author or Editor: Elizabeth W. Neuendorff x
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Abstract

We studied the horizontal and vertical root distribution of 3-year-old ‘Climax’ rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashei Reade) in a sandy loam soil. Root density decreased logarithmically in the horizontal direction from the crown and linearly with depth. Ninety percent of the roots were within 0 to 0.38 m from the crown and 0 to 0.45 m depth. Roots spread more within the rows than across rows. Sawdust mulch increased the radial spread of roots, but did not promote rooting in the top 0.15 m of soil. Compared to one or two drip emitters per plants, low-volume spray emitters increased radial spread of roots, but only in combination with mulching. Greatest vertical rooting occurred with a single emitter at the base of the plant without mulch. Emitters placed 0.46 m from the crown of the plant did not help the spread of roots towards these emitters.

Open Access

Abstract

Fruit from 7- and 8-year-old ‘Tifblue’ rabbiteye blueberry [Vaccinium ashei (Reade)] plants were harvested at 0600, 0900, 1200, and 1500 hr. Harvests occurred twice a season for each of 2 years. Fruit cullage after machine harvesting averaged ≈30% of total fruit harvested. The first machine harvest in a season had 6% to 16% less cullage than the last harvest. The number of mature fruit remaining on the plants after harvesting decreased with later harvest times during the day. Thus, an increase in harvester efficiency corresponded to decreased leaf water potential. The effect of harvest time during the day on packout and fruit quality after storage was inconsistent between and within years. There was no optimum time of day to machine-pick blueberries when fruit were promptly sorted and cooled after harvest.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Tifblue’ and ‘Delite’ rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashei Reade) plants were grown for 4 years with or without mulch, with cultivated or sodded row middles, and under various irrigation treatments [one drip emitter at the base of the plant, two drip emitters 46 cm on either side of the plant, or a 40° or 360° low-volume spray emitter (LVSE) placed midway between plants]. Plant establishment and growth were optimal with 360° LVSE. Differences between irrigation treatments were minimized with mulch. Mulch increased growth of drip-irrigated but not of LVSE-irrigated plants and increased the yield of two-emitter and 360° LVSE-irrigated plants but not of one-emitter or 40° LVSE-irrigated plants. Treatment effects on growth were more apparent in the early establishment phase than in the 4th year of growth and with ‘Tifblue’ than ‘Delite’. Frost damage on ‘Delite’ was reduced by mulch. Vegetative bud development in the spring and fruit maturity were usually delayed on plants grown between sodded alleys or with mulch. Leaf drop in the fall was also delayed by mulch.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Bounty’ peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was released because of its large fruit size, excellent flavor (as judged by us), and productivity, particularly under dry soil conditions of eastern Texas. Its ability to produce fruit of uniform maturity throughout the canopy makes it especially suitable for once-over harvesting. ‘Bounty’ has outstanding potential as a mid-season fresh-market peach for the south-central United States, particularly Texas, and is suggested for trial in the mid-Atlantic and eastern United States.

Open Access