Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Elizabeth Halpin x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Teri A. Hale, Richard L. Hassell, Tyron Phillips, and Elizabeth Halpin

Increased value of fresh sweet corn (Zea mays) during the last decade has lead to increased interest into the characteristics that increase marketability. Sweetness was examined over three phenotypes (su, se, and sh2) to determine if there was an optimum phenotype or cultivar within a phenotype. Each phenotype was isolated to prevent cross-pollinization. Cultivars were grown on sandy loam soil located at the Clemson University Coastal Research and Education Center (Charleston, S.C.). Early, mature, and late harvest dates were also evaluated to determine the optimal harvest date(s) for maximum flavor. High performance liquid chromatography was used to determine sucrose, fructose, glucose, and total sugars. Panelists' evaluation of sweetness and its acceptability significantly correlated with the high performance liquid chromatography analysis for sucrose and total sugars (sweetness, R = 0.70 and 0.61; acceptability, R = 0.64 and 0.55). Sucrose correlated with the total sugars (R = 0.95). As maturity increased, the ability of the taste panel to identify differences in phenotypes also increased. Although sucrose and total sugar levels were different between se, sh2, and su, taste panelists indicated no difference between se and sh2. Sh2 cultivars were considered sweet and acceptable on all harvest dates, but su was only acceptable to panelists at early maturity.

Full access

Teri A. Hale, Richard L. Hassell, Tyron Phillips, and Elizabeth Halpin

Taste panel perception and preference of pericarp tenderness in three phenotypes (su, se, and sh2) of sweet corn (Zea mays) harvested at three different maturities were compared to the readings received from a penetrometer. Pericarp tenderness perception by taste panel correlated with penetrometer measurements when phenotypes and maturities were compared. The penetrometer showed significantly lower readings for sweet corn harvested at early maturity than those harvested at late maturity. This was also noted in the panelists' perception of tenderness, with the early and mature harvest samples being preferred over those from the late harvest. The only difference between cultivars within phenotypes was noted in sh2 `Rustler' and `AXC904'. `Rustler' received the greatest overall pentrometer values and lowest panel ratings; conversely, `ACX904' had low penetrometer values and was perceived as tender and very acceptable to panelists. Correlations between penetrometer readings and panel perception of pericarp tenderness indicate that a puncture force, using a 0.118-inch (3.0 mm) probe, of greater that 0.95 g/inch2 (0.147 g·cm-2) indicated a tough pericarp and lower than 0.70 g/inch2 (0.109 g·cm-2) indicated a tender pericarp.