Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Edmund A. Estes x
Clear All Modify Search

Stable prices and increased competitive market pressures have caused many staked tomato producers to examine the costs and benefits of adopting intensive production practices such as drip irrigation and plastic mulch. Inclusion of these practices with traditional growing practices often results in a total production cost in excess of $10,000 per acre. In 1988 and 1989, field studies were conducted in western North Carolina to determine if changes in plant spacing and pruning could reduce production costs, increase yields of large fruit and improve grower net returns from staked tomatoes (c. Mountain Pride). Combined data indicated that the greatest early season yields were obtained using early pruning (when suckers were 2-4 inches long) and in-row spacings of 18 inches or less. Net returns per acre were greatest when: 1) plants were pruned early and spaced closely in-row, which increased high priced early season yields and 2) plants were spaced 30 inches apart and either pruned early or not pruned, which increased total season yields. Non-pruned plants had lower yields of Jumbo and Extra Large size fruit, but higher total yields than pruned plants.

Free access

Stable prices and increased competitive market pressures have caused many staked tomato producers to examine the costs and benefits of adopting intensive production practices such as drip irrigation and plastic mulch. Inclusion of these practices with traditional growing practices often results in a total production cost in excess of $10,000 per acre. In 1988 and 1989, field studies were conducted in western North Carolina to determine if changes in plant spacing and pruning could reduce production costs, increase yields of large fruit and improve grower net returns from staked tomatoes (c. Mountain Pride). Combined data indicated that the greatest early season yields were obtained using early pruning (when suckers were 2-4 inches long) and in-row spacings of 18 inches or less. Net returns per acre were greatest when: 1) plants were pruned early and spaced closely in-row, which increased high priced early season yields and 2) plants were spaced 30 inches apart and either pruned early or not pruned, which increased total season yields. Non-pruned plants had lower yields of Jumbo and Extra Large size fruit, but higher total yields than pruned plants.

Free access

Unstable prices and increased competitive market pressures have caused many staked-tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) producers to reexamine the costs and benefits of various production practices. In 1988 and 1989, field studies were conducted to determine if changes in plant in-row spacing and pruning could reduce production costs, increase yields, and improve grower net returns of staked `Mountain Pride' tomatoes. In both years, early-season yields were highest using early pruning (when lateral shoots were 5 to 10 cm long) or delayed pruning (when lateral shoots were 30 to 36 cm long) and in-row spacings ≤46 cm. In 1988, total-season yields per hectare of pruned plants increased as in-row spacing decreased. For nonpruned plants, however, total-season yields were high at all spacings. In 1989, total-season yields were lower from delayed-pruned plants than from nonpruned plants and there was little yield difference due to in-row spacing. In both years, nonpruned plants produced low yields of fruit >72 mm in diameter but their total yields were greater than those of pruned plants. Net returns per hectare, calculated from combined data of both years, were highest when 1) plants spaced closely in-row were pruned early and 2) plants were spaced 46 to 76 cm apart and either pruned early or not pruned.

Free access

Yield in most crops can be increased with closer in-row spacing; however, the costs vs. benefits need to be assessed. A partial economic analysis was conducted at various plant spacings and harvest times to determine the best cultural management strategy. The effect of plant spacings (15.2, 22.9, 30.5, and 38.1 cm) and two dates of harvest (≈110 or 130 days after planting) were studied on `Beauregard' sweetpotato in one planting in 1991 and two planting locations in 1992. Weights were obtained for the U.S. Number 1, canner, jumbo, and cull grades. The 30.5-cm spacing interval was used as the standard comparison for economic analysis. Yields of sweetpotatoes increased as in-row spacing decreased. Based on economic analysis, the 38.1-cm spacing was always inferior to the 30.5-cm spacing. The preferred in-row spacing of `Beauregard' sweetpotato is 22.9 if a late harvest is anticipated, while the 15.2-cm spacing would be best if harvesting at ≈110 days after transplanting. As long as moisture is not limiting and planting is before mid-June, sweetpotato growers should place `Beauregard' plants at an in-row spacing of 15.2 or 22.9 cm, depending on projected date of harvest, to obtain the best yields with the highest marginal return on investment.

Free access

The effects of plant spacing (15, 23, 31, and 38 cm) and date of harvest on yield and economic return of `Beauregard' sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] were studied. For comparison, `Jewel' was included at one spacing. As in-row plant spacing decreased, yield of U.S. No. 1, canners, and total marketable root production increased when plants were harvested 103 days or later after transplanting. The yield of jumbo roots generally increased with in-row spacing because of less plant-to-plant competition. Total marketable and No. 1 grade yields of `Beauregard' at the closest spacing (15 cm) were greater than those of `Jewel'. `Beauregard' roots sized more quickly than `Jewel' roots regardless of spacing. The optimal time for harvesting `Beauregard' was 100 to 110 days after transplanting, while acceptable yields could be obtained as early as 90 days after transplanting depending on market prices. Economic analysis of `Beauregard' spacing data indicated that 23 cm would be the preferred spacing if a late harvest was anticipated, while the 15-cm spacing would be best if harvested at ≈110 days after transplanting. Thus, sweetpotato growers should place `Beauregard' at an in-row spacing of 15 or 23 cm, depending on projected date of harvest, on or before 10 June, to obtain the best yields with the highest return on investment.

Free access