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  • Author or Editor: E.J. Holcomb x
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The flowering of Dwarf Bearded Iris as a potted plant requires knowledge of the effect of chilling time and photoperiod on the plant. An experiment was conducted to determine what combination of these two factors would lead to flowering. The treatments were chilling time (0,4, and 8 weeks) and irradiance treatment (short day, long day, and HID lighting). Iris rhizomes were potted into 6 inch pots, kept moist and placed in a 4°C cooler for the various lengths of time. These were then transferred to the different irradiance levels and allowed to flower in the greenhouse.

The plants that received 8 weeks of chilling flowered earliest, followed by those that received 4 weeks of chilling. The plants that were placed under HID lighting flowered earlier than those that were placed under long day light treatment. The plants that received short day light treatment did not flower except for those that received-8 weeks of chilling.

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Abstract

Abstract. Astilbe X arendsii Arends ‘Avalanche’, ‘Deutschland’, ‘Fanal’, and ‘Red Sentinel’ were chilled for 0, 3, 6, 9, or 12 weeks at 5°C. Maximum flower number, height, and fresh weight occurred when plants were chilled for 12 weeks. No flowering occurred when ‘Avalanche’ or ‘Deutschland’ were chilled for less than 9 weeks or when ‘Fanal’ and ‘Red Sentinel’ were chilled for less than 6 weeks. ‘Fanal’ and ‘Red Sentinel’ grew significantly taller when forced under a 14-hour than under a 9-hour photoperiod.

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Abstract

Simple, specialized instruments, such as tree calipers, tree diameter tapes, and fruit sizing templates, have been used to quantify dimensions of specific plant parts and provide a standard set of plant measurements. Forshey (3) used a band-type fruit caliper to measure the diameter of McIntosh apples to predict their size at time of harvest.

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Abstract

Osmotic stress produced the shortest plant with smallest bracts of Euphorbia pulcherrima Klotzsch. Soil drenches with 3000 ppm chloromequat [(2-chloroethyl)trimethylammonium chloride] or 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 or 1.00 mg ancymidol (alpha-cyclorproylalpha, para-methoxyphenyl, 5-pyrimidineme-thanol) per 15 cm pot were the most effective chemical methods of poinsettia height control. Metering either chemical into the irrigation-fertilization system also showed promise. Foliar sprays with ancymidol at 45, 90, 135 or 180 ppm were the least effective in controlling the height of ‘Eckespoint Cl Red’ or ‘Dark Red Annette Hegg’ poinsettias.

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Abstract

Plants of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. grown on a constant fertilization program were analyzed for elemental content, and the growing mix was analyzed by 3 different soil test methods. Optimum values for the nutrients reported by each of the soil tests were determined by using plant uptake data.

Open Access

The use of spent mushroom compost (SMC) as a media amendment for containerized greenhouse and nursery crop production is a promising alternative to disposal of this by-product of mushroom production. Fresh SMC is the compost that is removed from the mushroom house and used without further weathering. The objectives of this study include first, identification of key factors involved its successful use and second demonstration of the effective use of SMC by nurserymen. The plant material used includes both bedding plants and woody perennial species. Results demonstrate that the key factor in the use of SMC for plant production is high soluble salts. Leaching can reduce the high soluble salts. In addition, special consideration should be given to the reduction in potted media volume over time due to composting that continues after the material is removed from mushroom production. SMC as the sole growing media was not as effective as when SMC was amended with a commercial nursery growing mix. Several species were grown in 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% mixtures of SMC and a commercial nursery mix. All species grew well in 50% SMC/50% nursery mix.

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Abstract

Exacum affine Balb. plants grown at 85, 183, or 345 μE m-2s-1 from fluorescent and incandescent lamps flowered most rapidly at 345 μE m-2s-1. Plants grown at 183 μE m-2s-1 energy level were slower to flower, but plant forms were more acceptable commercially.

Open Access

Abstract

The time between sowing and flowering (crop cycle) of geranium Pelargonium × hortorum Bailey was affected by light, temperature, chloromequat chloride (CCC), and cultivar. A minimum daily light integral of 17 mol·d−1·m−2, provided by high-pressure sodium lamps (HPS) prior to transplanting, accelerated flower initiation. HPS, low pressure sodium (LPS), and metal halide (MH) lamps, used as supplemental light after transplanting, reduced the crop cycle significantly compared to incandescent (INC) or natural light only. Crop cycles were similar among the HPS, LPS, and MH lamp treatments when equal-input lamp wattage was used per unit growing area, even though PPF values at the plant canopy varied. Plants grown at 21° and 27°C had a 5- to 15-day-shorter crop cycle than plants grown at 18° and 21°. Generally CCC reduced the crop cycle, but not consistently for all cultivar and lighting combinations. Chemical names used: 2-chloro-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium chloride [chloromequat chloride (CCC)].

Open Access

Four rates of two slow-release fertilizers were tested for optimum growth of five hosta cultivars: Hosta sieboldiana `Elegans', Hosta plantaginea `Aphrodite', Hosta `Jade Scepter', Hosta `Hadspen Blue', and Hosta `Francee'. Tissue-cultured hostas from 2.5-cm plugs were planted in 6-inch (15-cm) pots filled with a commercial soilless medium, and the slow-release fertilizer was dibbled into the medium at 0, 3, 6, or 12 g/pot. The plants were maintained for 4 months. Root and shoot fresh and dry weights were recorded at the end of the experiment. In addition, foliar nutrient analysis was conducted on `Aphrodite', `Francee', and `Jade Sceptor'. Overall, hostas grew best when the medium was amended with 3 g of either Osmocote 14N-6P-11.5K or Sierrablen 17N-6P-12K slow-release fertilizer.

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A 2 by 4 factorial design was used to determine the effect of 4 mulches (Plastic cover, hydrophilic polymer, rockwool and none) and 2 irrigation delivery methods (surface and subirrigation) on the mass of water in MM 350 at saturation, container capacity and after irrigation on 4, 5 and 6 inch standard pots. An analysis of covariance was conducted with pot volume as the covariant.

With all treatments SWHC>CCWHC>EWHC. No significant differences resulted for SWHC with any mulch treatment or irrigation delivery method. There was no significant difference in CCWHC if either sub irrigated or surface irrigated for the same mulch. When subirrigated, gel mulch results in significantly more CCWHC than the plastic mulch - subirrigated treatment or the no mulch - surface irrigated - treatment.

Higher EWHC resulted when pots were surface irrigated. No mulch resulted in the lowest mass of water when either surface or sub irrigated. When subirrigated, no significant difference in water mass after irrigation resulted among either the gel, plastic or rockwool mulches.

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