Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for

  • Author or Editor: E.E. Albregts x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Craig K. Chandler, T. E. Crocker, and E. E. Albregts

During the past 10 years, the Florida strawberry growers, through the Florida Strawberry Growers Association, have made a serious commitment to fund university research on strawberries. They have purchased equipment and donated monies for facilities at Dover. They have also helped support a new faculty position in breeding and genetics. During this same period, the University of Florida has made an equally strong commitment to support strawberry research and extension. These commitments are beginning to pay significant dividends for industry and the University. Cultural and pest management information has been generated that is saving the industy money, and the breeding program is developing new cultivars that will keep the industry competitive in the marketplace. The University has benefitted through the acquisition of new facilities, equipment, and faculty and graduate student support.

Free access

Earl E. Albregts and C. K. Chandler

The phosphorus content is usually high in soils on which strawberry production occurs in west central Florida because of moderate P levels in the virgin soil and yearly applications of P by the growers. A P rate study was conducted to test the calibration of P for strawberry nursery production, and a randomized complete block design with four replicates was used. Rates of 0, 11, 22, and 33 kg/ha P were applied to a Seffner sand which had an initial soil P level of 86 mg/kg using the Mehlich II soil extractant. Soil tests routinely show P soil concentrations up to 250 mg/kg or greater with 86 mg/kg rated in the high range. In this study the P applied to the beds was cultivated into the soil and six plants of two strawberry clones (Fl 87-210 and Fl 85-4925) were set in each plot on 28 May 1991. All nutrients except P were applied as needed during the season. Leaf P content of daughter plants on 20 Aug 1991 varied from 0.23 to 0.25% among P treatments and were not different because of P rates. All marketable size daughter plants were harvested on 8 Oct 1991. The number, total wt, and average wt of daughter plants were not different because of applied P rates.

Free access

Earl E. Albregts and Craig K. Chandler

Four strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa, Duch.) cultivars were grown in a winter strawberry fruiting study using the annual hill cultural system and polyethylene-mulched beds during two seasons. Plants were set on 15, 30, 45, and 60 cm in row-plant spacing with two rows per bed spaced at 45 cm. Increasing plant density in the fruiting field generally increased early fruit yield and sometimes total fruit yield during two seasons. Yields of cull fruit were also increased with increased plant density. Daughter plant production decreased with increased plant density. Growers should consider planting costs, fruit rot, and harvesting problems when selecting the plant density for fruit production.

Free access

E.E. Albregts, C.M. Howard, and C.K. Chandler

Florida-developed strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duch.) clones or varieties grown in Florida nurseries and California-developed varieties grown in Canadian nurseries were evaluated in fruiting studies in Florida during four seasons. Transplants were defoliated so that 0%, 35%, 60%, or 87% of the foliage was removed. The Florida clones `Dover' and selection 79-1126 gave significant linear and/or quadratic early and total marketable yield responses to defoliation treatments for all seasons. The Canadian-grown clones `Chandler' and `Selva' gave similar responses during three seasons, but differences were not as great as for the Florida-grown clones. Many significant linear and quadratic responses in seasonal average fruit weight and plant size occurred for Florida-grown plants, but only one occurred with the Canadian-grown plants. Relative plant size at early and midseason decreased with greater defoliation.

Free access

C. K. Chandler, C. M. Howard, and E. E. Albregts

Progeny testing, both formal and informal, has been a component of the University of Florida strawberry breeding program. Informally, the potential of numerous parental combinations has been assessed by growing small populations of each combination, and then ranking these populations according to visual impression. Formal progeny testing, where variables are measured on seedlings in a replicated measurement block, was used during the 1987-88 season. Several families were identified as promising, based on an analysis of yield, fruit size, firmness, and appearance data.

Free access

E. E. Albregts, C. M. Howard, and C. K. Chandler

During 2 seasons, defoliated and non-defoliated strawberry plants were evaluated for their fruiting response using the annual hill cultural system in Dover, FL. Partially dormant Canadian grown `Chandler' and non-dormant locally grown FL breeding line 79-1126 were grown the first season. Locally grown `Dover' was added the second season. Total yields of all clones were reduced with foliage removed. Monthly yields were reduced the first season with FL 79-1126 defoliated plants, but only the April yield of defoliated `Chandler' was reduced. December, January, March, and total yields of defoliated plants from all clones were reduced the second season. Average seasonal fruit weight was reduced the second season with locally grown defoliated plants. During the second season the percent marketable fruit of `Chandler' and FL 79-1126 was greater with the defoliated plants.

Free access

E. E. Albregts, C. M. Howard, and C. K. Chandler

During 2 seasons, defoliated and non-defoliated strawberry plants were evaluated for their fruiting response using the annual hill cultural system in Dover, FL. Partially dormant Canadian grown `Chandler' and non-dormant locally grown FL breeding line 79-1126 were grown the first season. Locally grown `Dover' was added the second season. Total yields of all clones were reduced with foliage removed. Monthly yields were reduced the first season with FL 79-1126 defoliated plants, but only the April yield of defoliated `Chandler' was reduced. December, January, March, and total yields of defoliated plants from all clones were reduced the second season. Average seasonal fruit weight was reduced the second season with locally grown defoliated plants. During the second season the percent marketable fruit of `Chandler' and FL 79-1126 was greater with the defoliated plants.

Free access

E.E. Albregts, C.M. Howard, and C.K. Chandler

Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) was grown for two seasons on a fine sand soil to study the plant and fruiting response of three cultivars to K rates of O, 56, 112, 168, and 224 kg·ha-1. `Dover' total fruit yields increased linearly with rate both seasons while the maximum March yield the first season was with 170 kg K/ha. April yields increased linearly with K rate the first season. `Tufts' and `Chandler' responses to K rates were not consistent for monthly or total fruit yield. The average fruit weight of `Dover' and `Tufts' decreased linearly with increasing K rate for March and for the season in 1984, while `Dover' gave a positive linear average fruit weight response to K rate during Apr. 1986. `Dover' leaf K decreased from December to February, and K deficiency symptoms were expressed by February in treatments receiving lower rates of K. Leaf K concentrations of `Dover' correlated well with K rate.

Free access

Earl E. Albregts, George J. Hochmuth, and C. K. Chandler

During the 1992-93 fruiting season, straw berry plants were fertigated weekly with either 0.28, 0.56, 0.84, 1.12, or 1.40 kg/ha/day of K derived from KCl. Other nutrients were applied in the plant bed before fumigation except for N which was applied at 0.84 kg/ha/day by fertigation. Soil moisture in the plant beds was maintained between 10 and 15 cbs. Initial soil K tested medium with the Mehlich I soil test. Seasonal average fruit weight and percent marketable fruit decreased with increasing K rate. Seasonal fruit yields did not increase with K rates above 0.56 kg/ha/day. Leaf K concentrations increased with increasing K rates throughout the harvest season. The leaf K concentrations in the 0.28 K treatment were below 1% during the last month of harvest. K rates did not affect fruit firmness.

Free access

George J. Hochmuth, Earl E. Albregts, and Craig K. Chandler

During the 1992-93 fruiting season, strawberries were fertigated weekly with 0.28, 0.56, 0.84, 1.12, or 1.40 kg N/ha/day from ammonium nitrate. K was applied uniformly at 0.84 kg/ha/day by fertigation. Irrigation maintained soil moisture tension in the beds between -10 and -15 kPa. Fruit yields responded positively to N fertilization with yields maximized at 0.56 kg N/ha/day. Leaf N and petiole sap nitrate N concentrations increased with N rate with leaf-N for the plants receiving 0.28 kg N/ha/day remaining below 25 g·kg-1 most of the season. Sufficiency ranges for petiole sap nitrate-N quick testing were developed.