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  • Author or Editor: E. Tomer x
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Abstract

Seedless fruitlets of ‘Fuerte’ and ‘Ettinger’ avocado (Persea americana Mill.) (5 to 20 mm length) exhibited a typical degeneration pattern of the ovule which began at the chalaza and spread toward the micropylar region but stopped when about half of the integument was still intact. Embryo or endosperm or both were found in many seedless fruitlets. Degeneration was found to start at different stages of fruitlet development, from a proembryo to an embryo starting to develop cotyledons. Typical seedless fruit in ‘Fuerte’ and ‘Ettinger’ avocado appears to be the outcome of seed degeneration (stenospermocarpy) and not parthenocarpy.

Open Access
Authors: , , and

Abstract

Normal, abnormal, and degenerate ovules of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) are described and illustrated. The frequency of occurrence of these ovule types differed among 4 cultivars (‘Fuerte’, ‘Ettinger’, ‘Hass’, ‘Tova’) with a total frequency ranging from 15 to 40%. A higher frequency of apparently degenerative ovules increased the proportion considered defective to 80–98%. No relationship could be discerned between the percentage of normal ovules and the yields of 8 trees differing widely in fruitfulness.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Caro-Rich’, an indeterminate high pro-Vitamin A tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), was released in January 1973. It was named for its high β-carotene.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Lafayette‘ is a compact, determinate tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) intended for mechanical harvest. It was named for the city of Lafayette, Indiana.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Vermillion’ is a productive, determinate, crimson tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) with excellent fruit color. Its name, which gives attention to its outstanding fruit color, honors a county in Indiana.

Open Access
Authors: , , , and

Fruit development and abscission in `Mauritius' lychee (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) were studied over three consecutive seasons. Each season, two distinct abscission periods were observed. The first started at the end of full female bloom and continued for ≈ 4 weeks. Of the initial number of female flowers, 85 % to 90 % abscised during this period. The second period began after a lag period of≈ 1 week and lasted ≈ 2 weeks. About half of the remaining fruitlets abscised during this wave. AU of these fruitlets contained an embryo. The second wave coincided with a period of rapid embryo growth and endosperm loss. Tipimon (a commercial product containing the triethanolamine salt of the synthetic auxin 2,4,5-TP) consistently and significantly increased marketable fruit yield when applied between the two abscission periods. Chemical name used: 2,4,5 -trichlorophenoxy propionic acid (2,4,5 -TP).

Free access