Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 33 items for

  • Author or Editor: E. Nelson x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Man has depended upon fresh commodities for proper nutrition. However, history reveals that early voyages stopped abruptly upon the exhaustion of the fresh food supply, armies starved as their rations spoiled and became depleted, and settlers died during the winter months due to an insufficient supply of nutritious foods. In order to provide an adequate diet the year around, deterioration of the perishable foodstuffs had to be eliminated. Thus, the beginning and justification of modern food processing.

Open Access

Abstract

Those familiar with the fruit and vegetable processing industries are aware of the serious problems of the seasonal processor. The short and hectic harvest season produces a number of conditions that reduces the effectiveness of these horticultural industries. Some of the more serious problems include the following:

  1. Short supply of labor

  2. Processing bottlenecks

  3. Over production of certain products

  4. Large capital investment

  5. Sizable inventory expenses

  6. Large warehousing costs

  7. Large waste disposal load over a short period of time

  8. Raw product scheduling

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Success in presenting a paper at meetings of the Society requires that slides be of high quality and properly used. A paper has only one purpose- to inform. A slide has only one purpose- to portray information for quick understanding.

Open Access

A new tube method for determining physical properties in container substrates was compared to an existing system. While both offer the advantages of undisturbed substrate and measurement of properties without altering the geometry of the substrate in the container, the tube method is easier to conduct. Both methods proved equally effective for determining air-tilled porosity, container capacity, total porosity, bulk density, and particle density.

Free access

Absorption of “C-labeled glyphosate by whole carrot (Daucus carota L.) plants infected or not infected by swamp dodder (Cuscuta gronovii Willd ex R & S) increased from 14% 1 day after treatment to 56% 14 days after treatment. Absorption of 14C-labeled glyphosate did not increase from 14 to 45 days after treatment. 14Carbon-labeled glyphosate appeared in the carrot root 1 day after application and its concentration increased with time in both infected and noninfected plants until 14 days after treatment. From 14 to 45 days after treatment, the concentration of 14C-labeled glyphosate in the roots decreased. At 1 day after treatment, dodder tissue contained as much 14C-labeled glyphosate as any physiological sink in the carrot. At 45 days after treatment, dodder tissue contained more 14C-labeled glyphosate than all other physiological sinks, except the petiole of the treated leaf. Swamp dodder stems had absorbed 14C-labeled glyphosate directly from a solution within 1 day after treatment. Chemical name used: N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine (glyphosphate).

Free access

Abstract

‘Lafayette‘ is a compact, determinate tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) intended for mechanical harvest. It was named for the city of Lafayette, Indiana.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Vermillion’ is a productive, determinate, crimson tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) with excellent fruit color. Its name, which gives attention to its outstanding fruit color, honors a county in Indiana.

Open Access

Abstract

Seed lots of several vegetables, including garden beans, cabbage, cantaloupe, cucumber, lettuce, okra, onion, garden peas, pepper, spinach, and tomato, and two seed lots of Kentucky bluegrass were exposed to 40-MHz radiofrequency (RF) electric fields and tested to determine the influence of the electrical treatment on germination performance. Germination was significantly increased by RF treatment through reduction of hard-seed content in beans, okra, and peas. Acceleration of germination was evident in seed lots of bluegrass, tomato, and spinach. It was particularly marked and consistent with spinach. Acceleration of spinach emergence was also noted in soil tests. The influences of seed moisture content, seed size, and characteristics of the RF electric field were also considered. Improved responses are attributed to thermal stresses developed in seed during RF treatment, but further research is recommended to explain the responsible mechanisms.

Open Access

Abstract

The effects of 10% carbon monoxide (CO) added to air or controlled atmospheres (2% O2 with or without 5% CO2) on quality and storage life of grapes (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Thompson Seedless) were compared with those of the conventional SO2 fumigation treatments for decay control. CO in air reduced respiration and C2H4 production rates, and retarded berry browning and softening, but was only partially effective in retarding decay beyond 2 months at 0°C. SO2 treatments were very effective in controlling the spread of decay, but brown discoloration of the berries increased, especially after 2 months at 0° or 1°. When combined with 2% O2 with or without 5% CO2, CO inhibited C2H4 production and retarded decay development, but the presence of CO2 increased brown discoloration of the berries. A combination of 2% O2 + 10% CO was as effective as SO2 in controlling decay of grapes held at 0° for up to 4 months and caused less browning and bleaching than SO2.

Open Access

Abstract

Tomato fruit were found to accumulate at optimum harvest in proportions of 52-55% all red, 15-20% orange, 7-10% pink, and 15-26% green or overripe. A harvest ratio of 8 parts all red, 3 parts orange, and 1 part pink fruit gave a USDA tomato color index reading ranging from 66.1 to 67.4. In comparison, the all red fruit portion produced a 68.9 to 73.0 color index. Quality changes of the 8:3:1 blend processed juice were found in color, flavor, and ascorbic acid content, but the blends from all cultivars appeared to be commercially acceptable. Taste panel tests indicated no significant preference for all red over blended juice samples. The pH, titratable acidity, and refractive index were not significantly altered by the use of less than red ripe fruit. Utilizing the single harvest ratio of all red, orange, and pink fruits increased per acre yields 20-30%.

Open Access