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  • Author or Editor: E. L. Bergman x
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Abstract

Three cultivars of cabbage (Brassica oleracea L., Capitata group, cvs. Grandslam, Hybrid H, Resistant Danish) were field-grown during 1977 and 1978 to determine the relationship between the percentage of soil-exchangeable Ca, Mg, and K and yield, black speck disease severity and leaf Ca, Mg, K, N, P, Fe, Mn, B, Cu, Zn, and Al concentrations. Highest yields were obtained in soil with a cation exchange capacity of 5% Mg, 5% K and 75–80% Ca. Magnesium and K soil treatments had little consistent effect on elemental leaf concentrations. Leaf Cu and cultivar were related to severity of black speck. The cultivar showing no disease symptoms also had the lowest leaf Cu concentrations.

Open Access

Abstract

A greenhouse and a growth chamber experiment were conducted to study the influence of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on growth and elemental composition of a hydroponically-grown, susceptible and a resistant pepper cultivar. Foliar symptoms were more severe and appeared 2 weeks earlier on the CMV-infected susceptible than on the CMV-infected resistant cultivar. CMV-infected susceptible plants were stunted before foliar symptoms appeared. Roots were stunted to a greater extent than the aerial portions. Virus infection had no effect on the growth of the resistant cultivar. The amount of solution taken up by the infected susceptible plants was lower than by noninfected ones either before or after symptoms appeared on terminal leaves. The pH of the nutrient solution in which the infected plants were grown was lower prior to symptom expression and conductivity readings were higher than for the solution with noninfected plants. At 1 week after inoculation, prior to the expression of foliar symptoms, concentrations of P, K, Mn, Fe, and Cu were lower in the CMV-infected susceptible than noninfected plants. At 3 weeks after inoculation, and after symptoms were observed, infected resistant plants had a lower concentration of K, Mn, and Fe in the basal leaves than infected resistant plants. Little change in elemental concentration of susceptible plants occurred after symptoms appeared on the terminal leaves. However, due to the stunting effect of virus on susceptible plants, several elements were lower on a total accumulation basis at 2, 3, and 4 weeks after inoculation. The CMV effect on individual elements was dependent on cultivar, severity of stunting, and the number of days after inoculation leaf samples were collected.

Open Access

Abstract

Eggplants (Solanum melongena L. cv. Long Purple) were grown hydroponicajly with 3 levels of Mg, and inoculated with the U-l strain of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to determine the influence of host Mg nutrition on concentrations of infectious virus in the leaves. There was a decrease in concentration of infectious TMV in leaves as leaf-Mg increased. Severely Mg-deflcient plants had higher virus concentrations than plants that received adequate or excessive Mg.

Open Access

Abstract

Greenhouse nutrient cultures with lx and 2x modified Hoagland solutions were used to study the influence of bean yellow mosaic and tomato ringspot virus isolates on elemental content of plant parts of ‘Dark Red Kidney’ beans. All isolates reduced fresh and dry wt of plants. Plants grown in 2x solution were somewhat smaller than those treated with lx solution.

Solutions increased in pH and conductivity but decreased in volume. Control solution volumes decreased more while pH’s and conductivities increased more than those of comparable solutions containing virus-infected plants. Control plants absorbed more total P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, and B from the solutions than inoculated ones.

Both increases and decreases in nutrient content of bean plants resulted from virus infection, higher concentrations and total amount of Mn in virus-infected plant parts and a possible association between plant K level and the amounts of water absorbed by roots was observed. Interpretation of elemental content has to be based on virus and/or isolate, plant part sampled, time of sampling, nutrient solution concentration and element.

Open Access

Abstract

The effects of growth retardant succinic acid 2,2-dimethylhydrazide (SADH) on tomato transplants were evaluated in 9 field experiments. Two or more applications of 5,000 ppm of SADH at the seedling stage offers promise in scheduling tomato harvest by decreasing early yield.

Open Access