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  • Author or Editor: E. J. Wehunt x
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Abstract

‘Redglobe’ peaches (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) were grown under drip irrigation and no irrigation, with and without fumigation with 1,2–dibromo–3–chloropropane (DBCP). The irrigation treatments were 1) nonirrigated, 2) irrigated until harvest, 3) irrigated from harvest to dormancy, 4) irrigated all season. Fumigation increased trunk cross-sectional area by 18 cm2, and when postharvest water was applied the increase was 25 cm2 at the end of 1978. Irrigation increased marketable yields of fresh peaches from 3.6 to 7.4 MT/ha (62-150 bu/acre) in 1977. In 1978, fumigation did not increase yields unless preharvest water was applied; then, yields were increased from 12.1 to 17.2 MT/ha (232-357 bu/acre). Fumigation apparently increased water use as indicated by the increased rate of controlled water application. Fumigation reduced populations of Macroposthonia xenoplax (Raski) DeGrisse and Loof, from a range of 30-400 to a range of 1-30 nematodes/150 cm3 of soil.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Redglobe’ peaches [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] were grown under drip irrigation. Applications of NH4NO3 through the irrigation system were compared with broadcast applications. Soil pH, where NH4NO3 was applied through the irrigation system, decreased in the top 30 cm from 6.2 to 3.7 pH in the zone wetted by emitters that had been in place for 2 years, and from 6.2 to 4.5 pH in the zone where emitters had been in place for 6 months. Aluminum concentration in wetted zones increased from 0.01 to 1.45 meq/100 g of soil after 2 years and from 0.02 to 0.73 meq/100 g of soil after 6 months of NH4NO3 application through drip irrigation. Soil Ca and Mg concentrations were reduced in both wetted zones, but the greatest decrease occurred in the 2-year emitter site. The addition of NH4NO3 in the irrigation water substantially reduced root growth in the vicinity of the emitters, irrigation water application, and fruit yield, because of the high A1 concentration in the wetted zone.

Open Access

Abstract

Two cultivars of strawberries originally harvested for fresh market were held under 5 postharvest storage treatments and then dipped in one of 4 chemical treatments. The berries were sliced or left whole, dipped, and then processed by freezing or thermal processing. The processed product from ‘Cardinal’ was superior to that from ‘Sunrise’ in this study, regardless of the holding or dip treatment. ‘Cardinal’ berries could be utilized for processing initially and after storage for 4 days at 4°C and after 2 days at 21°; however, ‘Sunrise’ was acceptable only initially and up to 4 days at 4°. Dipping berries for 1 min in a 0.5% calcium lactate solution or a 0.5% Ca lactate plus 1% citric acid solution improved berry firmness and character. The Ca dips were more effective in firming sliced berries than in firming whole berries. The Howard mold count of the berries became a major limiting factor for many of the postharvest storage treatments.

Open Access

Abstract

Effects of 8 peach seedling rootstocks on tree growth, survival, and fruit yield of ‘Redhaven’ and ‘Loring’ peach scion cultivars were tested in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Lovell seedling rootstock was a standard for comparison. Six years of data indicated that Siberian C was not an acceptable rootstock because tree survival and fruit yield were low. Halford was equivalent to Lovell for tree growth, fruit yield, and survival. Fruit size was unaffected by rootstock. Nemaguard and 2 North Carolina selections were resistant to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) but they were not resistant to ring nematodes [Criconemella xenoplax (Raski) Luc and Raski]. Soil fumigation improved tree survival in nematode-infested soil.

Open Access