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  • Author or Editor: Douglas A. Bailey x
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Abstract

Equal doses of uniconazole were applied in differing spray volumes to plants of chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev. ‘Ovaro’) to examine carrier volume effects on uniconazole efficacy. Plants received 204 ml water/m2 (controls) or 102, 204, 306, or 408 ml·m−2 of 40, 20, 13.3, or 10 mg uniconazole/liter, respectively. Treatments did not affect time from start of short days to bloom. Inflorescence display diameter was not affected by spray carrier volume, but was less for uniconazole-treated plants than for controls. No carrier volume effect on plant height was observed, but all uniconazole treatments resulted in plants shorter than controls. Plants of poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ‘Annette Hegg Brilliant Diamond’, ‘Gutbier V-14 Glory’, ‘Eckespoint Celebrate’, and ‘Eckespoint Jingle Bells 3’) were sprayed with 204 ml water/m2 (controls) or 102, 204, 306, or 408 ml·m−2 of 20, 10, 6.7, or 5 mg uniconazole/liter, respectively. Treatments did not affect time from start of short days to anthesis or bract canopy diameter. Spray carrier volume did not affect plant height, but uniconazole-treated plants were shorter at anthesis than controls. The results obtained do not support the hypothesis that spray carrier volume affects the efficacy of uniconazole on chrysanthemums or poinsettias. Chemical name used: (E)-1-(p-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-1-penten-3-ol (uniconazole).

Open Access

Abstract

Florists’ hydrangea is a woody perennial that has been adapted to potted plant production. A major factor in a hydrangea forcing program is height control. Currently, daminozide is used for reducing internode elongation in hydrangeas, but high concentrations (5000 to 7500 mg-liter-1) are sometimes needed to control vigorous cultivars such as ‘Rose Supreme’ (Jung, 1964; Ulery, 1978). Uniconazole has been shown to be an effective height-controlling agent at low concentrations for woody perennials, including Forsythia, Ligustrum, Pyracantha, and Rhododendron spp. (Knox and Norcini, 1987; Vaigro-Wolff and Warmund, 1987). Therefore, uniconazole was examined as a potential height-controlling chemical for florists’ hydrangea. Dormant plants of H. macrophylla ‘Rose Supreme’ were defoliated and placed into 4C dark storage for 6 weeks beginning 2 Dec. 1987. On 13 Jan. 1988, the plants were removed from the cooler, potted one per 1.3-liter plastic container, and placed into a 26/15C (venting/night) greenhouse. The growth medium consisted of a 1 soil : 2 sphagnum peat : 2 perlite (by volume) mixture amended with 890 g treble superphosphate, 593 g KNO3, 593 g MgS04, 4.75 kg ground dolomitic limestone, and 74 g Frit Industries Trace Elements No. 555 (Peters Fertilizer Products, W.R. Grace & Co., Fo-gelsville, Pa.) per cubic meter. The plants were fertilized at each watering with Ν and K, each at 200 mg-liter-1, supplied from 367 mg NH4NO3/liter and 517 mg KNO3/liter, respectively. Fertilizer solution was maintained at 6.0 pH by injecting 75% (w/w) technical grade H3PO4 into the system, supplying 37 mg P/liter at every watering. Each plant was pruned at potting, allowing only two shoots per plant to develop, and pots were spaced at 40 × 40 cm during forcing.

Open Access

The 8th annual Southeast Greenhouse Conference and Trade Show (SGCTS) will be held in June 2000. This meeting is the result of cooperative efforts among the Alabama Nurserymen's Association, Florida Nurserymen and Growers Association, Georgia Commercial Flower Growers Association, North Carolina Commercial Flower Growers' Association, South Carolina Greenhouse Growers Association, Tennessee Flower Growers Association, Virginia Greenhouse Growers Association; and the Cooperative Extension Services and Land Grant Universities of all seven participating states, including Auburn Univ., Clemson Univ., the Univ. of Florida, the Univ. of Georgia, North Carolina State Univ., Univ. of Tennessee, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., and Virginia State Univ. Through pooling of efforts and resources, the SGCTS has become one of the major floriculture educational and trade show events in North America, and it has grown from an initial participation of 347 and a trade show of 89 booths in 1993 to 2407 participants and 398 booths in 1999. The SGCTS serves as an excellent example of cooperative partnering among grower organizations, Cooperative Extension, and faculty at Land Grant Institutions. It eliminates duplication of efforts among individual states, each historically holding their own state meeting. Proceeds from the conference support grower organizations, which in turn support research and educational programs at the cooperating universities. Over $55,000 were disbursed back to the state associations in 1999.

Free access

Regional cooperative efforts such as the Southern Association of Agricultural Experiment Station Director's Advisory Committees, Development Committees, Multi-State Research Fund supported projects, and Southern Extension/Research Activities Information Exchange Groups have been in existence and have been successful for many years. However, there are opportunities and compelling circumstances for more intensive regionalized efforts, including multi-state faculty positions and multi-state cooperatives. The University of Georgia is involved in three multistate horticulture faculty positions—an orchard floor management specialist (shared with Clemson University and North Carolina State University), an apple research position (shared with Clemson University, North Carolina State University, and The University of Tennessee), and an apple extension specialist (shared with The University of Tennessee)—and one multi-state cooperative, the Southern Region Small Fruit Consortium (supported by Clemson University, North Carolina State University, The University of Georgia, and The University of Tennessee). Justification for these regional efforts includes the following: 1) federal legislation now mandates multi-institutional and integrated (research and extension) activities; 2) state boundaries form artificial barriers that are transparent to clientele groups, problems, and solutions; 3) decreasing state budgets have resulted in faculty and staff reductions at many institutions, with a subsequent decline in services to clientele groups; and 4) in times of limited funding, universities must focus on areas of excellence and collaborate with other institutions to fill in the remaining gaps. Benefits we have realized from these efforts include the following: 1) better service for minor commodities; 2) better educational programs due to larger venues and pooled overhead funds; 3) enhanced communication among institutions leading to increased cooperative efforts in other areas; and 4) reduced duplicity among institutions resulting in freed up resources to address other high priority areas. There are challenges unique to regional cooperatives: 1) travel distances for extension faculty may be increased and require a high degree of planning and coordination; 2) depending on the housing location of the shared specialist, response time can be greater than if program were housed in-state; and 3) shared programs require open, effective, and increased communications among cooperators. In our experience, the benefits of regionalization far outweigh the additional challenges encountered. However, to be successful: 1) the whole must be greater than the sum of the parts; 2) each partner must have identify preservation; 3) stakeholders must realize value from the programs and must be kept abreast of program successes to assure their continued support.

Free access

Abstract

Oriental hybrid lilies (Lilium speciosum Thunb.) are grown as flowering potted plants or cut flowers (Ball, 1985). However, a major problem with oriental hybrid lilies grown as pot plants is plant height greater than desired for an appropriate aesthetic ratio (Sachs et al., 1976). Uniconazole is an effective chemical growth retardant on other lily species and has the advantage over ancymidol of high activity at very low dosages (Hol-comb and McDowell, 1987; Shumac et al., 1988). With the present work, we evaluated the effectiveness of uniconazole in controlling height of two L. speciosum hybrids and compared uniconazole with ancymidol.

Open Access

Plants of Euphorbia pulcherrima Wind. `Glory' were grown under total irradiances of 13.4, 8.5, or 4.0 mol·m-2·day-1 and sprayed with water (control), 2500 mg daminozide/liter + 1500 mg chlormequat chloride/liter (D + C), 62.5 mg paclobutrazol/liter, or 4, 8, 12, or 16 mg uniconazole/liter to ascertain plant developmental and postproduction responses to treatment combinations. Anthesis was delayed for plants grown under the lowest irradiance. Anthesis was delayed by the D + C treatment, whereas other growth retardant treatments had no effect on anthesis date. Irradiance did not affect plant height at anthesis, but all growth retardant treatments decreased height over control plants. Inflorescence and bract canopy diameters were decreased at the lowest irradiance level. Growth retardants did not affect individual inflorescence diameters, but all, except paclobutrazol and 4 and 8 mg uniconazole/liter, reduced bract canopy diameter compared with control plants. Plants grown under the lowest irradiance developed fewer inflorescences per plant and fewer cyathia per inflorescence. Cyathia abscission during a 30-day postanthesis evaluation increased as irradiance was decreased; cyathia abscission was unaffected by growth retardant treatment. Leaf abscission after 30 days postanthesis was lowest for plants grown under the lowest irradiance. At 30 days postanthesis, all growth retardant treatments increased leaf abscission over controls. Results indicate that irradiance and growth retardant treatments during production can affect poinsettia crop timing, plant quality at maturity, and subsequent postproduction performance. Chemical names used: 2-chloroethyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (chlormequat chloride); butanedioic acid mono (2,2-dimethyl hydrazide) (daminozide); β-[(4-chlorophenyl) methyl]- α -(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol (paclobutrazol), (E)-1-(p-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-l-penten-3-ol (uniconazole, XE-1019).

Free access

Abstract

Several lines of copy were omitted in the paper, “Rapid Propagation and Establishment of Florists' Hydrangea”, by Douglas A. Bailey and Thomas C. Weiler, in the Dec. 1984 issue of HortScience 20(6):850–852.

Open Access

Plants of Euphorbia pulcherrima Wind. `Glory' were grown under 13.4, 8.5, or 4.0 mol·m-2·day-1 and sprayed with water (control); 2500 mg·liter-1 daminozide + 1500 mg·liter-1 chlormequat chloride (D+C); 62.5 mg·liter-1 paclobutrazol; or 4, 8, 12 or 16 mg·liter-1 uniconazole to ascertain plant developmental and pest-production responses to the treatment combinations. Days to anthesis increased as irradiance was decreased. Anthesis was delayed by the D+C treatment, while other growth retardant (GR) treatments had no effect on anthesis. Irradiance did not affect plant height at anthesis, but all GR treatments decreased height over control plants. Bract display and bract canopy display diameters declined as irradiance was decreased. Growth retardants did not affect individual bract display diameters, but all GR treatments except paclobutrazol reduced bract canopy display diameter. Plants grown under lower irradiance had fewer axillary buds develop, fewer bract displays per plant, and fewer cyathia per bract display. Cyathia abscission during a 30 day post-anthesis evaluation was not affected by treatment; however, plant leaf drop was linearly proportional to irradiance. All GR treatments increased leaf drop over controls, and the D+C treated plants had the highest leaf loss. Results indicate the irradiance and GR treatments during production can affect poinsettia crop timing, plant quality at maturity, and subsequent post-production performance.

Free access