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Emily Shepard, Diane Doud Miller, and Gregory Miller

Abstract

Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima Bl.) has much potential as a nut-producing orchard or landscape tree, being resistant to chestnut blight [Endothia parasitica (Murr.) P.J. & H.W. Anderson] and high-yielding. Chestnut is monoecious and largely self-sterile, requiring cross-pollination to produce nuts (Sanders, 1974). There is considerable variation in nut traits, such as size and sugar content, even among nuts from the same tree (Miller, 1987), due to, in part, xenia effects. The nut is composed mostly of cotyledonary tissue with a small embryo and no endosperm (Sanders, 1974). Propagation by seed is generally successful; however, no criteria exist for selection of nuts that will produce superior seedlings. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationships between seed weight, seedling emergence, and seedling growth of half-sib Chinese chestnut seeds.

Free access

Craig K. Chandler, Diane Doud Miller, and David C. Ferree

Open access

Craig K. Chandler, Diane Doud Miller, and David C. Ferree

Abstract

Experiments were conducted to examine strawberry (Fragaria × anannassa Duchesne) plant renovation practices, singly and in combination, for effects on vegetative growth of greenhouse-grown, potted strawberry plants. The major results of these experiments were as follows: a) most of the plants that were both defoliated and root-pruned after fruit harvest died; b) there was a negative linear relationship between the number of leaves removed and the number of new leaves and runners produced; c) root, leaf, and total plant dry weights were negatively correlated with the severity of root pruning; and d) soil addition after fruit harvest decreased the shoot : root ratio of multiple-crown plants, but had no effect on single-crown plants.

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Emily E. Hoover, Richard P. Marini, Emily Tepe, Wesley R. Autio, Alan R. Biggs, Jon M. Clements, Robert M. Crassweller, Daniel D. Foster, Melanie J. Foster, Peter M. Hirst, Diane Doud Miller, Michael L. Parker, Gregory M. Peck, Jozsef Racsko, Terence L. Robinson, and Michele R. Warmund

Researchers have collected a considerable amount of data relating to apple (Malus ×domestica) cultivars and rootstocks over the past 30 years, but much of this information is not easily accessible. The long-term goal of our working group is to increase access to this information using online technology available through eXtension. In eXtension, researchers and extension personnel are developing a community of practice (CoP) to increase the quality and amount of online information for individuals interested in our work [referred to as a community of interest (CoI)]. For this project, our CoI is broadly defined as commercial apple producers, nursery professionals, county extension educators, Extension Master Gardeners, home gardeners, and consumers. Our CoP is developing diverse educational tools, with the goals of increasing productivity, profitability, and sustainability for commercial apple production. Additionally, we will provide other members of our CoI access to research-based, reliable information on the culture of apples. We chose to begin our focus on cultivars and rootstocks adapted to the eastern United States and will add other U.S. regions as our resources and interest in our project grows.