Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 58 items for

  • Author or Editor: Dewayne L Ingram x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

This symposium was sponsored primarily by the Commercial Horticulture Working Group in the Extension Division of ASHS. The International Horticultural Congress provides an excellent opportunity for horticulturists, especially horticultural educators, from around the world to exchange experiences and ideas. Extension in the context of this symposium refers to the transfer of technology or the linkage from a research-based information pool to producers, processors, marketers, and consumers of horticultural commodities. Extension programs are expected to help ensure the adoption of appropriate technologies by individuals, groups, or segments of an industry. The primary goals of an extension program are to increase production, product quality, business profits, and/or the quality of life. This symposium involved uniquely qualified individuals in describing and contrasting model extension delivery systems from around the world.

Open Access

Abstract

White polyethylene bags were superior to black, 6 liter conventional containers for production of Cornus florida L., Rhododendron simsii Planch, cv. Formosa and Pittosporum tobira Banks in full sun. All 3 species grew best in 47% shade, where effects of container design were moderated Poly bags were brittle within 6 months in full sun and could not withstand rough handling.

Open Access

This presentation focuses on driving forces and philosophies in the current Age of Accountability and explores ideas of how to respond. The increased scrutiny faced by all public agencies is requiring that Cooperative Extension approach the issue of accountability a bit differently. We must articulate our objectives and values to specific clientele groups, the general public, and government officials. Hard questions are being asked about past and anticipated return on tax dollars invested in state and federal agencies. The Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 requires “performance based budgeting” for all federal agencies, including the USDA. Each federal agency must develop an action plan with well-defined objectives and anticipated impacts to justify the allocation of federal funds. The overriding theme is not how busy we are and how many activities we can report, but what has been the impact of our efforts.

Free access

Abstract

The thermostability of Ilex crenata Thunb. ‘Helleri’ and Ilex vomitoria Ait. ‘Schellings’ root cell membranes at supraoptimal temperatures were determined using electrolyte leakage procedures with excised roots. Mathematical models were developed to describe effects of treatment temperature and exposure time interactions on membrane thermostability. Critical temperature, Tc, decreased linearly as exposure duration increased exponentially, and predicted Tc for ‘Helleri’ and ‘Schellings’ were 51.0 ± 0.8 and 52.6 ± 0.7°C, respectively, for a 30-min exposure and 43.9 ± 0.8 and 46.7 ± 0.3° for a 300-min exposure. Three dimensional plots of the fitted mathematical functions are presented.

Open Access

Abstract

Excised roots of Pittosporum tobira Thunb. were exposed to temperatures of 25° to 60°C for 30 to 300 min before cell membrane thermostability was determined by electrolyte leakage procedures. Response to treatment temperature for each exposure duration was sigmoidal. The critical temperature causing injury to root cell membranes decreased linearily as exposure duration increased exponentially. A mathematical model to describe the interaction of treatment temperature and exposure duration on membrane thermostability is presented.

Open Access

The contributions of interrelated production system components of a field-grown, 2-m-tall, 5-cm-caliper Picea pungens (colorado blue spruce) in the upper midwestern (liner) and lower midwestern (finished tree) regions of the United States to its carbon footprint were analyzed using life cycle assessment protocols. The seed-to-landscape carbon footprint was 13.558 kg carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e), including sequestration of 9.14 kg CO2e during production. The global warming potential (GWP) from equipment use was the dominant contributor to the carbon footprint of production. Seventy-six percent of the GWP investments during field production occurred at harvest. Querying the model, among other things, revealed that adding one year to the field production phase would add less than 3% to the seed-to-landscape GWP of the product. The weighted positive impact of carbon (C) sequestration during a 50-year life was 593 kg CO2e. After its useful life, takedown and disposal would result in emissions of 148 kg CO2e, resulting in a net positive, life cycle impact on atmospheric CO2 of ≈431 kg CO2e.

Free access

The University of Kentucky's Department of Horticulture, led by the extension faculty working with targeted industry associations, facilitated the creation of the Kentucky Horticulture Council to be the voice of a diverse industry. Leadership in industry strategic planning, promoting the opportunities for expansion of the horticulture industry, and educating state agriculture, legislative and university leaders provided a focus of energy and positioned the industry to access emerging resources. Leadership development has been an anticipated byproduct of this process.

Full access

Seeds of Sophora secundiflora (Ort.) Lag ex. DC. (mescal bean) were scarified with hot water or concentrated sulfuric acid to determine an optimal pretreatment for successful germination. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that the acid scarification treatment removed the seed cuticle. One-year-old seeds were successfully stored and germinated ≈2 days sooner than from the current year if both were given an acid pretreatment. Germination rate increased as acid pretreatment time increased from 30 to 120 minutes. Soaking seeds in water at room temperature or in hot water (initially 93C) for 24 hours had no effect on germination.

Free access

Root growth of southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora Hort. `St. Mary') was studied for 16 weeks after an 8-week exposure to 30, 34, 38, or 42 ± 0.8C root-zone temperature (RZT) treatments applied for 6 hours daily. Immediately after RZT treatments, total root length of trees responded negatively to increased RZT in a quadratic pattern and the shoot and root dry weight of trees was similar. However, 8 and 16 weeks after RZT treatments, total root length responded linearly in a negative pattern to increased RZT, and shoot and root dry weight responded negatively to increased RZT in a linear and quadratic pattern, respectively. Root dry weight of trees exposed to 42C RZT treatment was 29% and 48% less than 38 and 34C RZT treatments, respectively, at week 8. By week 16, root dry weight as a function of RZT had changed such that the 42C RZT was 43% and 47% less than 38 and 34C RZT, respectively. Differences in root growth patterns between weeks 8 and 16 suggest that trees were able to overcome the detrimental effects of the 38C treatment, whereas growth suppression by the 42C treatment was still evident after 16 weeks.

Free access