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  • Author or Editor: David T. Tingey x
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Abstract

Data on plant response to stress are used to implement the Toxic Substances Control Act, the Clean Air Act, and other federal regulations. Phytotoxicological data are essential in assessing the environmental hazards inherent in waste, sludge and/or dredge spoil disposal methods and in evaluating the potential or existing impacts of various industrial and/or energy processes.

Open Access

Abstract

The radish cv. Cherry Belle was exposed to 5 pphm ozone and/or 5 pphm sulfur dioxide for 40 hr per week for 5 weeks and compared with controls grown in charcoal filtered air. Ozone and/or sulfur dioxide significantly reduced the plant fresh wt, leaf fresh wt, root fresh and dry wt and root length and width. The effects of the combinations of the 2 gases were additive except for plant fresh wt, root length and root fresh and dry weights where the effects were significantly less than additive. Low concns of ozone and sulfur dioxide can be significant factors in the growth and yield of radishes.

Open Access

Abstract

Eight lettuce and 9 radish cvs. were exposed for 1.5 hr to 70 and 35 pphm ozone, respectively, and ranked according to their sensitivity. ‘Dark Green Boston’ was the most sensitive while ‘Great Lakes’ and ‘Black-Seeded Simpson’ were the least sensitive of the lettuce cvs. tested. ‘Cherry Belle’ was the most sensitive and ‘Icicle’ was the least sensitive of the radish cvs.

Open Access

Abstract

Twelve cultivars of tomato were exposed to 40 pphm ozone for 1.5 hr in separate morning and afternoon exposures to determine differences in cultivar sensitivity. Nearly all of the cultivars exposed in the afternoon developed more injury than similar cultivars exposed in the morning. Cultivar ranking, however, was the same in morning and afternoon exposures. ‘Roma VF’ and ‘Red Cherry’ were among the most sensitive cultivars tested and ‘Heinz 1439’ and ‘VF 145B’ were the least sensitive of the 12 tomato cultivars tested.

Open Access

Abstract

Plants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. were grown in hydroponic systems using vermiculite as a growth medium at nutrition levels ranging from adequate to deficient. Plants grown on the low-total nutrient or low-iron nutrient contained more of iron, magnesium, and aluminum, frequently twice as much as plants grown at normal nutrient levels. Plants grown in iron-deficient nutrient were initially chlorotic; after about 5 weeks the chlorosis disappeared and these plants contained higher tissue iron levels than those receiving iron in the solutions. Concentrations of aluminum in the foliage ranged between 2 and 5 mg/g dry weight. Chemical analysis of the nutrient solution indicated that there was not sufficient aluminum, as a contaminant, in the nutrient solution to account for the concentrations that occurred in the plant tissue. Apparently, plants experiencing nutrient stress may modify the root environment so that vermiculite is solubilized and iron, magnesium, and aluminum are taken up by the plant. Levels of aluminum that accumulate in Arabidopsis foliage suggest that it should be classified as an aluminum-accumulating plant.

Open Access