Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: David L. Wood x
Clear All Modify Search

Several experimental procedures were used to evaluate the influence of solar radiation on insect infestations in Calimyma and Adriatic variety figs (Ficus carica L.). Direct sunlight eliminated infesting insects and prevented further infestation of ripe figs drying on the ground for at least 10 days. Placement in the shade resulted in 12% insect infestation in figs within 3 days. Figs that fell naturally into sunlit areas contained almost no insects, whereas 31% of figs that fell into dense shade were infested. While ripening figs were still attached to trees, the level of insect infestation was 50% higher on the shady north side than the sunny south south side. The insect pests most frequently encountered in these experiments were nitidulid beetles and their larvae. Disease incidence was not affected by degree of exposure. We propose that cultural techniques to maximize exposure of ripening and drying figs to solar radiation could be developed as important pest management tools.

Free access

Abstract

Several experimental procedures were used to evaluate the influence of solar radiation on insect infestations in Calimyrna and Adriatic variety figs (Ficus carica L.). Direct sunlight eliminated infesting insects and prevented further infestation of ripe figs drying on the ground for at least 10 days. Placement in the shade resulted in 12% insect infestation in figs within 3 days. Figs that fell naturally into sunlighted areas contained almost no insects, whereas 31% of figs that fell into dense shade were infested. While ripening figs were still attached to trees, the level of insect infestation was 50% higher on the shady north side than the sunny south side. The insect pests most frequently encountered in these experiments were nitidulid beetles and their larvae. Disease incidence was not affected by degree of exposure. We propose that cultural techniques to maximize exposure of ripening and drying figs to solar radiation could be developed as important pest management tools.

Open Access

Containerized `Owari' satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) on Poncirus trifoliata `Flying Dragon' rootstock were exposed to one of two acclimation regimes (cold acclimated and unacclimated) and frozen in a computer-controlled freezer to five different low temperatures. Whole plant survival was measured and compared to the results of four leaf and stem injury assays. Acclimating plants in growth chambers at 20 °C day and 10 °C night for 14 days, followed by 15 °C day and 4 °C night for 14 to 21 days resulted in an 81% and 80% increase in leaf and stem survival, respectively, when frozen to a low of -8 °C. Electrolyte leakage and phenolic leakage assays effectively detected changes in percent leaf survival, but the TTC stain assay, using leaf disks, did not. Stem survival was best predicted by the TTC assay, using the phloem as the indicator tissue for survival. Electrolyte leakage and phenolic leakage were also reliable assays for predicting stem survival, although survival percentages were different at the same electrolyte leakage values reported in other studies. The callus growth assay accurately predicted survival for cold acclimated satsuma mandarin stems only. Chemical name used: triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC).

Free access

Pitch canker, caused by Fusarium subglutinans f. sp. pini, causes branch dieback and stem cankers in many species of pine. Monterey pine (Pinus radiata D. Don), one of the most widely planted pines in the world, is extremely susceptible to pitch canker. Four other pine species, which might serve as alternatives to Monterey pine in landscape settings, were found to be relatively resistant, based on the size of lesions resulting from branch inoculations under greenhouse conditions. Of these species, Japanese black pine (P. thunbergiana Franco) was the most resistant, followed by Canary Island pine (P. canariensis Sweet ex K. Spreng), Italian stone pine (P. pinea L.), and Aleppo pine (P. halepensis Mill.). Consistent with these findings, a field survey conducted in Alameda County, Calif., revealed Monterey pine to have the highest incidence of infection, with significantly lower levels in Aleppo, Canary Island, and Italian stone pines. Japanese black pine was not observed in the survey area.

Free access

Pitch canker, caused by Fusarium subglutinans f. sp. pini, causes branch die-back and stem cankers in many species of pine. Monterey pine (Pinus radiata D. Don), one of the most widely planted pines in the world, is extremely susceptible to pitch canker. Four other pine species, which might serve as alternatives to Monterey pine in landscape settings, were found to be relatively resistant, based on the size of lesions resulting from branch inoculations under greenhouse conditions. Of these species, Japanese black pine (P. thunbergiana Franco) was the most resistant, followed by Canary Island pine (P. canariensis Sweet ex K. Spreng), Italian stone pine (P. pinea L.), and Aleppo pine (P. halepensis Mill.). Consistent with these findings, a field survey conducted in Alameda County, Calif., revealed Monterey pine to have the highest incidence of infection, with significantly lower levels in Aleppo, Canary Island, and Italian stone pines. Japanese black pine was not observed in the survey area.

Full access