Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for

  • Author or Editor: David Kopsell x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

David Kopsell

Pocket Guide to Rhododendron Species. J.F.J. McQuire and M.L.A. Robinson. 2010. Published by Kew Publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; distributed by the University of Chicago Press. 704 pages; 700 color plates. $97.00, Hardcover. ISBN 13: 978-1-84246-148-8.

For anyone interested in identifying rhododendrons currently in cultivation to species, this is the field reference for you. It is a complete guide to the taxonomy and characteristics of over 1,000 rhododendron species and is presented in an easy-to-follow format with over 700 color photographs. McQuire and Robinson have condensed the work of H.H. Davidian, the original author of the Rhododendron Species

Free access

Jonathan Damery and David Kopsell

The Vegetative Key to the British Flora. J. Poland and E. Clement. 2009. Published by John Poland, Southhampton, in association with the Botanical Society of the British Isles, Botany Department, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London. 526 pages. 24 color plates. $40.00 (£25.00), Softcover. ISBN 13: 978-0-9560144-0-5.

Becoming an expert on identifying naturalized plants in an area is a task that may literally require years of training or practice. Flowers are the key for taxonomic guides, and it may take several seasons before the flowers of a certain plant can be observed in bloom. The British, however, are

Full access

Ann Marie VanDerZanden, David Sandrock, and David Kopsell

Horticulture graduates entering the landscape (design, installation, and maintenance) segment of the green industry will be faced with a myriad of complicated decision scenarios. Graduates must be able to integrate their understanding of plant science, environmental and physical site constraints, and the human impact on built and natural landscapes to make complex decisions. The objectives of this project were to develop an online case study for use in landscape management and landscape construction courses, and to determine students' perceptions of using this virtual case study to practice active problem solving in landscape horticulture. After completing a scenario from the online case study, students were asked to complete a 20-question survey instrument consisting of open- and close-ended questions evaluating the case study. Sixty-nine surveys were returned and useable, for a response rate of 76.6%. Overall student attitudes and perceptions of the online case study were positive. Participants felt comfortable using the web-based format (4.3 of 5), and felt it was an effective way to deliver information (4.1). Furthermore, participants rated their ability to summarize the scenario data as 4.2 and also felt confident in their ability (4.1) to make a landscape management recommendation to the homeowner.

Free access

Dean A. Kopsell, David E. Kopsell, and Joanne Curran-Celentano

Kale (Brassica oleracea L.) ranks highest among vegetable crops for lutein and beta-carotene carotenoids, which function as antioxidants in disease prevention. Nitrogen (N) rate and N form influence plant growth and alter pigment composition and accumulation. The objectives of these experiments were to investigate the effect of N rate and form on biomass and accumulation of plant pigments in the leaf tissues of kale. Three kale cultivars were grown using nutrient solution culture. In the first study, N treatment rates were 6, 13, 26, 52, and 105 mg·L–1, at a constant NH4-N:NO3-N ratio. Kale biomass increased linearly in response to increasing N rate. On a fresh weight basis, lutein and beta-carotene were not affected by N rate. However, carotenoids calculated on a dry weight basis increased linearly in response to increasing N rate. In a second study, kale was grown under: 100% NH4-N:0% NO3-N, 75% NH4-N:25% NO3-N, 50% NH4-N:50% NO3-N, 25% NH4-N:75% NO3-N, and 0% NH4-N:100% NO3-N, at a N rate of 105 mg·L–1. Linear increases in biomass were observed for each kale cultivar as percentage of NO3-N increased. Lutein concentrations increased 155%, 73%, and 39% for `Toscano', `Winterbor', and `Redbor' kale, respectively, as N form changed 0% NO3-N to 100% NO3-N. Concentration of leaf beta-carotene increased linearly in response to increasing NO3-N in each cultivar tested. Nitrogen management should be considered in crop production programs designed to increase the concentrations of nutritionally important carotenoids.

Free access

William M. Randle, David E. Kopsell, and Dean A. Kopsell

A major decision in producing onions with mild flavor on low sulfur soils is determining when to stop applying SO4 -2 to the crop. Sulfate (SO4 -2) is necessary for good early growth, but high levels of available SO4 -2 late in the season increase bulb pungency. The objective of this research was to determine how sequentially reducing the availability of SO4 -2 during onion growth and development would affect flavor intensity and quality of Granex-type onions. Starting 77 days before harvest, SO4 -2 concentrations were lowered from 1 mm to 0.05 mm on different blocks of onions in a greenhouse experiment at bi-weekly intervals. Total leaf and bulb S were measured at harvest to monitor S accumulation as SO4 -2 fertility was sequentially reduced. Bulbs were harvested and analyzed for flavor precursors and their biosynthetic intermediates, gross flavor intensity as measured by enzymatically developed pyruvic acid (EPY), and soluble solids content. As SO4 -2 fertility reductions were delayed during the experiment, total leaf and bulb S increased linearly. In addition, bulb EPY concentrations increased linearly as SO4 -2 reduction was delayed, indicating increases in overall flavor intensity. While the total concentration of flavor precursors did not significantly change in response to lowering SO4 -2 fertility during the experiment, the concentrations of MCSO to 1-PRENCSO did. MCSO concentration decreased and then increased in a quadratic manner. MCSO produces fresh onion and cabbage like flavors. 1-PRENCSO, on the other hand, increased linearly as the high SO4 -2 fertility level was extended through bulb maturation. Increasing concentrations of 1-PRENCSO causes onions to have significantly more heat and mouth burn when eaten. Reducing available SO4 -2 49 days prior to harvest coincided with a reduction in EPY and a change in the flavor biosynthetic pathway that appeared to be associated with the metabolic changes occurring with the onset of bulbing. Chemical names used: enzymatically developed pyruvic acid (EPY); methyl cysteine sulfoxide (MCSO); 1-propenyl cysteine sulfoxide (1-PRENCSO).

Free access

Dean A. Kopsell, Scott McElroy, Carl Sams, and David Kopsell

Vegetable crops can be significant sources of nutritionally important dietary carotenoids and Brassica vegetables are sources that also exhibit antioxidant and anticarcinogenic activity. The family Brassicaceae contains a diverse group of plant species commercially important in many parts of the world. The six economically important Brassica species are closely related genetically. Three diploid species (B. nigra, B. rapa, and B. oleracea) are the natural progenitors of the allotetraploid species (B. juncea, B. napus, and B. carinata). The objective of this study was to characterize the accumulation of important dietary carotenoid pigments among the genetically related Brassica species. The HPLC quantification revealed significant differences in carotenoid and chlorophyll pigment accumulation among the Brassica species. Brassica nigra accumulated the highest concentrations of lutein, 5,6-epoxy lutein, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin. The highest concentrations of beta-carotene and total chlorophyll were found in B. juncea. Brassica rapa accumulated the highest concentrations of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin. For each of the pigments analyzed, the diploid Brassica species accumulated higher concentrations, on average, than the amphidiploid species. Brassicas convey unique health attributes when consumed in the diet. Identification of genetic relationships among the Brassica species would be beneficial information for improvement programs designed to increase carotenoid values.

Free access

Dean A. Kopsell, David E. Kopsell, and Joanne Curran-Celentano

Therapeutic compounds in herbal crops are gaining recent attention. Sweet basil (Ocimumbasilicum L.) is a popular culinary herbal crop grown for both fresh and dry leaf markets. Recently, basil (unidentified cultivar) was shown to rank highest among spices and herbal crops for xanthophylls carotenoids. This class of carotenoids is associated with decreased risks of certain cancer and age-related eye diseases. The research goal for the current study was to characterize the concentrations of nutritionally important carotenoid pigments among popular varieties of basil. Eight cultivars of sweet basil (`Genovese', `Italian Large Leaf', `Nufar', `Red Rubin', `Osmin Purple', `Spicy Bush', `Cinnamon', and `Sweet Thai') were grown in both field and greenhouse environments and evaluated for plant pigments using HPLC methodology. Environmental and cultivar differences were significant for all of the pigments analyzed. `Sweet Thai' accumulated the highest concentrations of lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-carotene carotenoids, while `Italian Large Leaf' had the lowest concentrations. Comparing the two environments, cultivar means for carotenoid and chlorophyll pigments were higher in the field environment when expressed on both a fresh and dry weight basis. Exceptions were found only for the purple leaf basils (`Osmin Purple' and `Red Rubin'). Positive and highly significant correlations existed between carotenoid and chlorophyll pigments in both environments. This study demonstrates that sweet basil can accumulate high levels of nutritionally important carotenoids in both field and greenhouse environments.

Free access

Dean A. Kopsell, David E. Kopsell, and Joanne Curran-Celentano

Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) is a popular culinary herbal crop grown for fresh or dry leaf, essential oil, and seed markets. Recently, basil was shown to rank highest among spices and herbal crops for xanthophyll carotenoids, which are associated with decreased risks of cancer and age-related eye diseases. The research goal for the current study was to characterize the concentrations of nutritionally important carotenoid pigments in popular varieties of basil. Eight cultivars of sweet basil (`Genovese', `Italian Large Leaf', `Nufar', `Red Rubin', `Osmin Purple', `Spicy Bush', `Cinnamon', and `Sweet Thai') were grown in both field and greenhouse environments and evaluated for plant pigments using HPLC methodology. Environmental and cultivar differences were observed for all of the pigments analyzed. `Sweet Thai' accumulated the highest concentrations of lutein, zeaxanthin, and β-carotene carotenoids in the field, while `Osmin Purple' accumulated the highest carotenoid concentrations in the greenhouse. Comparing the two environments, cultivar levels for carotenoid and chlorophyll pigments were higher in the field environment when expressed on both a fresh and dry weight basis. Exceptions were found only for the purple leaf basils (`Osmin Purple' and `Red Rubin'). Positive correlations existed between carotenoid and chlorophyll pigments in both environments. This study demonstrates sweet basil accumulates high levels of nutritionally important carotenoids in both field and greenhouse environments.

Free access

David E. Kopsell and William M. Randle

Short-day (SD) and long-day (LD) cultivars of onion (Allium cepa L.) representing various storage and flavor characteristics were greenhouse-grown to maturity. Bulbs were harvested and cured, then stored at 4C and evaluated monthly for pyruvic acid concentration (EPY), soluble solids content (SCC), and weight loss (WL). The EPY of `Dehydrator #3' (SD) decreased linearly with storage while EPY of `Granex 33' (SD) increased linearly. The EPY of `Zenith' (LD) had a quadratic response, decreasing then increasing during storage, while EPY of `Sweet Sandwich' (LD) increased then decreased quadratically during storage. Cultivar SSC generally decreased, while WL increased during storage.

Free access

David E. Kopsell and William M. Randle

Pungency and bulb quality changes during storage were evaluated using onion (Allium cepa L.) cultivars representing different storage abilities, pungency, and soluble solids content. Bulbs were harvested from greenhouse-grown plants, cured, and stored for 3 or 6 months at 5 ± 3 °C, 80% ± 5% relative humidity (0.8 to 1.1 kPa vapor pressure deficit). Prior to storage, and after each month of storage, bulbs were evaluated for pungency by measuring enzymatically formed pyruvic acid (EPY), soluble solids content (SSC), percent loss in mass (%ML), and loss of dormancy. Pungency differed among cultivars prior to and during storage. Among short-day (SD) cultivars, EPY either decreased or increased linearly with increased storage duration. Among intermediate (ID)- and long-day (LD) cultivars, EPY decreased linearly or quadratically during storage. Short-day cultivar SSC increased, then decreased quadratically during storage, while ID and LD cultivar SSC decreased linearly over time. Percent loss in mass increased linearly during storage among all cultivars, although SD cultivars exhibited greater %ML than did ID or LD cultivars.