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Dennis J. Werner and Dana F. Moxley

The relationship between malate dehydrogenase (MDH) genotype and plant vigor in peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was examined in two F2 populations (selfed `Belle of Georgia' and `Cresthaven') segregating at the Mdhl locus. Total numbers of progeny examined were 1610 and 998 in the `Belle of Georgia' and `Cresthaven' populations, respectively. In both populations, plant vigor (as defined by total height and trunk caliper after 1 year of growth) was significantly less in homozygous F/F (Mdh1-1/Mdh1-1) individuals. Homozygous S/S (Mdh1-2/Mdh1-2) individuals showed the greatest vigor, and were significantly different in vigor from homozygous F/F (Mdh1-1/Mdh1-1) individuals in both populations and from heterozygous F/S (Mdh1-1/Mdh1-2) individuals in the `Belle of Georgia' population. A significant deviation from the expected 1 F/F:2 F/S:1 S/S ratio was observed in the `Belle of Georgia' population, suggesting moderate lethality of homozygous F/F genotypes.

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Dennis J. Werner and Dana F. Moxley

The relationship between malate dehydrogenase (MDH) isozyme genotype and plant vigor in peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was examined in two F2 populations (selfed `Belle of Georgia' and `Cresthaven') segregating at the Mdh1 locus. Total progeny examined were 1610 and 998 in the `Belle of Georgia' and `Cresthaven' populations, respectively. In both populations, plant vigor (as defined by total height and trunk caliper after 1 year of growth) was significantly less in Mdh1-1/Mdh1-1 homozygotes. Homozygous Mdh1-2/Mdh1-2 individuals showed the greatest vigor, and were significantly different in vigor from Mdh1-1/Mdh1-1 homozygotes in both populations and from Mdh1-1/Mdh1-2 heterozygotes in the `Belle of Georgia' population. A significant deviation from the expected 1 Mdh1-1/Mdh1-1: 2 Mdh1-1/Mdh1-1: 1 Mdh1-2/Mdh1-2 ratio was observed in the `Belle of Georgia' population, suggesting moderate lethality of homozygous Mdh1-1/Mdh1-1 genotypes.

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Ron G. Goldy and Dana F. Moxley

A laboratory exercise is outlined and discussed for embryo culture of bean, corn, and pea embryos. Fresh, inexpensive material is generally available for these crop species throughout the year. The exercise gives students experience in embryo excision and exposure to some benefits of embryo rescue. Embryos from the three species are identified easily and can be removed without magnification, and data can be obtained within 3 weeks after culture. Further investigations using embryos are suggested.