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J.J. Mangas, E. Dapena, M.S. Rodriguez, J. Moreno, M.D. Gutiérrez, and D. Blanco

Water-soluble pectin (WSP), chelator-soluble pectin (CSP), and hydrochloric acid-soluble pectin (HASP) were monitored in five Asturian apples (Malus domestics Borkh.) throughout ripening. The alcohol-insoluble solid content was found to decrease during ripening, while those of the WSP and CSP fractions increased in the final stages of ripening. This increase was probably at the expense of the HASP content, which had decreased by the end of the ripening period.

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A. Ruiz*, D.S. Rodriguez, G.A. Picchioni, J.G. Mexal, and T.W. Sammis

Low-cost, sustainable wastewater treatment systems are needed for rapidly-growing communities of the southwestern United States. The objective of this study is to develop a practical management plan for land application of industrial wastewater on native Chihuahuan Desert vegetation. To assess environmental impact and create the management plan, wastewater effluent characteristics, soil physicochemical changes, and mineral uptake of the vegetation were monitored. The effluent was saline, ranging from 2500 to 6000 mg·L-1 of TDS and dominated by Na and Cl. Total N ranged from 10 to 40 mg·L-1. Soils sampled in Dec. 2002 (after 11 months and 64 cm of effluent irrigation) increased in salinity in the top 60 cm from 1.85 to 3.5 dS·m-1, and SAR in the top 30 cm was close to 15, but diminished with depth. Branch samples of the co-dominant perennial shrub vegetation members (Larrea tridentata and Prosopis glandulosa) harvested in July 2002 had elevated Na and Cl concentrations (0.4% to 2.1% of dry weight, respectively). By Oct. 2002, L. tridentata leaves contained comparable Na and Cl concentrations as those of P. glandulosa, yet removed 2 to three times more Na, Cl, and total N per branch, while maintaining their dry mass per branch. This raises the possibility of interspecific variation among the shrub species in salinity stress tolerance and capacity to remove wastewater contaminants. These data will aid in determining total vegetation removal of effluent components, preventing adverse environmental impact to the site, and developing a practical management plan suitable for small communities seeking cost-effective wastewater handling protocols.

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Edward J. Nangle, David S. Gardner, James D. Metzger, Dominic P. Petrella, Tom K. Danneberger, Luis Rodriguez-Saona, and John L. Cisar

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation poses a potential stress for plant growth and development due to its effect on photosynthesis and plant productivity. In the northern hemisphere, peak UV radiation exposure is predicted to occur from 2010 to 2020, with reduced color from UV-related injury, a possibility for turfgrasses. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light on turfgrass growth and morphology in three cool-season grasses. Cultivars Barvado tall fescue [Schedonorus arundinaceus (Schreb.) Dumort., nom. cons.], Penncross and L-93 creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.), and Barlenium perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), were selected because of limited information on their growth and development in elevated UV conditions at heights of cut above 10 cm. The impact of UV-B light treatment on color, relative growth rate, and tillering was measured over a 4-week period in repeated experiments. Ultraviolet-B radiation levels were measured at 16 kJ·m−2·d−1 biologically effective UV-B light in growth chambers programmed for a day/night regime of 14/10 hours. Chamber temperatures were maintained at 20 °C day/17 °C night. Ultraviolet-B light significantly inhibited tiller production in the first experiment in all grasses except PR, whereas no grasses were inhibited in the second experiment. Relative growth rates in all grasses were significantly lower in UV-B conditions 3 weeks after treatment initiation. Turfgrasses exposed to this level of UV-B light at typical lawn heights-of-cut had lower color ratings compared with the non-UV-B-treated control at 2 weeks after treatment initiation. The experiments demonstrated that exposure to UV-B resulted in a decline of growth rate and color in cool-season turfgrasses within a timeframe of 2 weeks. Coarse-textured turfgrasses [tall fescue (TF)/perennial ryegrass (PR)] may be more adapted to higher UV-B conditions due to morphological differences compared with the finer textured varieties [creeping bentgrass (CB)].