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  • Author or Editor: D. W. Baldwin x
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Two adjacent rootstock trials were conducted in the east coast Indian River region of Florida with ‘Marsh’ grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) scion. The objective was to find rootstocks to replace sour orange (C. aurantium L.) because of losses to citrus tristeza virus, and to replace Swingle citrumelo [C. paradisi × Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.] because of its limited usefulness in certain poorly drained coastal sites. The trials were conducted in randomized complete blocks with 12 single-tree replicates spaced 4.6 × 6.9 m. The soils were of the Wabasso and Riviera series. The first trial consisted largely of trees on citrange [C. sinensis (L.) Osb. × P. trifoliata] and citrumelo rootstocks, ‘Cipo’ sweet orange (C. sinensis), and various hybrid rootstocks. The second trial involved mandarin rootstocks (C. reticulata Blanco) and sour orange and related rootstocks. Trees were grown for 7 years and yield and juice quality data were collected for the last 4 years of that period. Those rootstocks identified as the most promising, based on combinations of smaller tree size and high productivity and juice quality, were two Sunki mandarin × Swingle trifoliate orange (TF) hybrids (C-54, C-146), a Sunki mandarin × Flying Dragon TF hybrid, C-35 citrange, and a Cleopatra mandarin × Rubidoux TF hybrid (×639). The trees on these five rootstocks cropped well leading to soluble solids (SS) values of 3000 to 4000 kg/ha when they were 7-years old. The trees on C-54 and C-146 were relatively large, somewhat taller than trees on sour orange, whereas those on C-35 and the Sunki × Flying Dragon hybrid were smaller and similar to sour orange in tree height. Fruit quality among the trees on C-35 and the Sunki × Flying Dragon hybrid had relatively high SS concentration (better than sour orange), and the other three rootstocks had relatively lower solids concentration (poorer than sour orange). The trees on C-35 and the Sunki × Flying Dragon hybrid would be good candidates for higher density orchards.

Free access

Abstract

Foliar ozone sensitivity evaluations of 5 fresh market tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cultivars from fumigation experiments were contrasted with field trial yields at Riverside, California, a high ambient dose location (3798 pphm-hour > 10 pphm). Foliar injury was not an accurate indicator of yield response as a correlation of foliar susceptibility and yield rankings was insignificant. Cultivar production characteristics at the South Coast Field Station (222 pphm-hour > 10 pphm) and at Riverside were identical with standardized field plots of ‘6718 VF’ from a concurrent experiment. Reduced fruit size and depressed early season production, previously correlated with ozone dose, were characteristic of all cultivars planted at Riverside. Comparisons of cultivar production rankings revealed that ‘H-ll’ and ‘6718 VF’ yielded significantly more, in terms of weight and number of fruit harvested than ‘Ace’, ‘Polepak’, or ‘Earlypak 7’. All cultivars except ‘Ace’ produced equivalent yields in terms of weight at South Coast Field Station.

Open Access

Abstract

A multiple regression analysis of yields of ‘6718 VF’ tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) from 11 field plots along an ambient ozone gradient in southern California indicated that ozone was responsible for a significant reduction in fruit size. Ozone dose accounted for 85% of the reduction in fruit size and was at least 3.3 times more important than any of the monitored meteorological variables in predicting the percentage of marketable fruit. High ambient ozone depressed production and caused a significant decrease in fruit size over time. A model describing the reduction in marketing container yield (% reduction = 0 + (.0232 x dose)) predicted a 50% reduction at a dose of 2000 pphm-hours > 10 pphm.

Open Access