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  • Author or Editor: D. Thayne Montague x
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Gas exchange and growth of transplanted and non-transplanted Acer platanoides `Schwedleri' and Tilia cordata `Greenspire' trees were investigated. This study was conducted on trees planted in 1991 in a field nursery near Logan, Utah. In Spring 1995, three trees of each species were moved with a tree spade to a new location within the nursery and three non-transplanted trees were selected as controls. To simulate landscape conditions, all trees were watered at the time of planting and once per week during the growing season. Pre-dawn water potential, dawn-to-dusk stomatal conductance, mid-day photosynthesis, and growth data were collected over a 2-year period. Transplanted trees of each species were under more water stress (indicated by more negative pre-dawn water potential) than non-transplanted trees. However, pre-dawn water potential of transplanted A. platanoides recovered to near non-transplanted levels, while transplanted T. cordata did not. Dawn-to-dusk studies in 1995 and 1996 showed that stomatal conductance was lower throughout the day in transplanted trees. Once again, transplanted A. platanoides recovered to near non-transplanted levels, while transplanted T. cordata did not. A similar trend for mid-day photosynthesis was found for both species in 1995 and 1996. Transplanted trees of each species had less stem area increase, shoot elongation, and total leaf area than non-transplanted trees for each year. These data indicate that transplanted A. platanoides can recover to near non-transplant pre-dawn water potential and gas exchange levels earlier, and therefore establish faster, than transplanted T. cordata. However, after 2 years neither transplanted tree species were able to fully recover to non-transplanted growth rates.

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This study was conducted to determine the influence of production methods on the growth of container grown flowering dogwood (Cornus florida). The production practices were: full sun, 40% white shade cloth, 40% black shade cloth, and pot-in-pot. The cultivars studied were: cv. `Welch's Junior Miss', cv. `Barton's White', cv. `Weaver's White', and cv. `Welch's Bay Beauty'. The one variety used was pink. Height and caliper data was collected. Plants grown under white shade cloth had the highest overall height and caliper growth, followed by black shade cloth, full sun, and the pot-in-pot production method. The cultivar `Weaver's White' had the highest overall height and caliper growth and the variety pink had the least, regardless of treatment. The remaining cultivars had similar growth regardless of treatment.

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