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  • Author or Editor: D. T. Pope x
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Abstract

Recent studies showed that at harvest sweetpotato storage roots contain as much as 10 milliliters of intercellular space per 100 milliliters of root; during storage intercellular space increases to the extent that it becomes visible and is classified as pithiness or internal breakdown (1). A preliminary report shows that by accounting for the intercellular space tissue specific gravity values can be computed and correlated with drymatter content in much the same manner as for Irish potatoes (2). At harvest intercellular space for each of four varieties was relatively constant for a given variety and differed significantly among varieties (4).

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Changes in pH and total acidity, comparable to those that occur in chilled roots during storage, take place in the field while the roots are still in the ground if wet, cold, soil conditions develop.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Intercellular space measurements of ‘Nugget’ and ‘Centennial’ sweetpotatoes were significantly different due to variety, evacuation and holding periods, and the interaction of curing with evacuation and holding periods but not different because of curing alone, root length, dry-matter content, or uncorrected specific gravity. To determine intercellular space accurately, evacuation time should be no less than 10 min and holding in water after evacuation no less than 15 min.

Open Access

Abstract

A parent-offspring study of 40 sweetpotato lines grown in 6 environments provided heritability (%) estimates for 10 root characters as follow: weight, 41; number edible roots, 32; veining, 30; growth cracks, 51; flesh oxidation, 64; shape, 62; flesh color, 66; cortex thickness, 45; skin color, 81; and skin purpling, 74. In most cases the realized changes due to selection fit the predictions very well. The additive component of genetic variance was relatively more important than the non-additive for all traits except veining and number of edible roots. The study illustrates the usefulness of quantitative genetic approaches to sweetpotato breeding.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Nugget’, ‘Gem’, ‘Goldrush’ and ‘Centennial’ sweet potato cultivars were grown for 3 yr at 3 locations in North Carolina. Root samples were collected at peak harvest (about October 1) each year and examined for intercellular space (IS). At 1 location each year a collection was made 3 wk prior to peak harvest, at peak harvest, and 3 wk after peak harvest. Cultivars differed significantly from one another in IS at harvest and averaged 6.26, 7.32, 8.41 and 9.85 ml/100 ml of root for ‘Nugget’, ‘Gem’, ‘Goldrush’ and ‘Centennial’, respectively. Over the 3-yr period IS did not differ significantly due to location, time of harvest, or years.

Open Access