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  • Author or Editor: D. L. Coudriet x
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Abstract

Resistance to muskmelon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) was transferred by successive backcrossing without selection from Cucumis melo L. cv. Gulfstream to a breeding line of muskmelon resistant to the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii (Glover), as a single recessive gene. This hypothesis is supported by the shift of resistant plants from 50 to 100% resistance in backcrossed and inbred progenies. The same gene, designated nsv for necrotic spot virus, for resistance was shown to be present in ‘PMR-5′ and ‘Planters Jumbo’. This finding documents the value of repeated backcrosses in breeding programs designed to transfer single gene characters from exotic sources into adaptive cultivars.

Open Access

Abstract

Greenhouse and field tests showed casaba melon, (Cucumis melo L. cv. Deserta Naja) to be highly susceptible to the western spotted cucumber beetle (Diabrotica undecimpunctata ssp. undecimpunctata Mannerheim). F1 and F2 progenies derived from a cross between ‘Deserta Naja’ and a comparatively resistant melon aphid-resistant breeding line ‘Top-Mark’ were nearly as susceptible as ‘Deserta Naja’, indicating a dominance of susceptibility. The mean damage to the progeny was significantly different from that of ‘Deserta Naja’; however, this indicated that dominance was incomplete. Greater numbers of the beetles on ‘Deserta Naja’ than on other entries in a field trial indicated that preference is associated with its high susceptibility. Differential damage to ‘Top-Mark’ in free-choice and no-choice tests supported the theory that resistance includes non-preference.

Open Access

Abstract

In the paper, Studies of Ovlpositional Preference of Cabbage Looper on Progenies from a Cross between Cultivated Lettuce and Prickly Lettuce by A. N. Kishaba, J. D. McCreight, D. L. Coudriet, T. W. Whitaker, and G. R. Pesho (J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 105(6):890–892. 1980), the last sentence of the first paragraph should read: Two of the plant introductions, PI261653 (Lactuca saiigna) and PI274372 (L. serriola) were less preferred as oviposition sites (7). In addition, reference 2 of the literature cited should be deleted and references 3 through 12 should be renumbered 2 to 11 to accurately correspond with citations in the text.

Open Access

The spread of watermelon mosaic virus by the melon aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover) was 31%, 74%, and 71% less to a melon aphid-resistant muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) breeding line than to the susceptible recurrent parent in a field cage study. Aphid-resistant and susceptible plants served equally well as the virus source. The highest rate of infection (97.9%) was noted when target plants were all melon-aphid susceptible, least (26.7%) when the target plants were all melon-aphid resistant, and intermediate (69.4%) when the target plants were an equal mix of aphid-resistant and susceptible plants. The number of viruliferous aphids per plant required to cause a 50% infection varied from five to 20 on susceptible controls and from 60 to possibly more than 400 on a range of melon aphid-resistant populations. An F family from a cross of the melon aphid-resistant AR Topmark (AR TM) with the susceptible `PMR 45' had significantly less resistance to virus transmission than AR TM. Breeding line AR 5 (an aphid-resistant population with `PMR 5' as the recurrent parent) had significantly greater resistance to transmission than other aphid-resistant populations.

Free access

Abstract

F1 progenies from a cross between Lactuca sativa L. breeding line 54671 and L. serriola L. PI 274372 (resistant to the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hubner), averaged 42 ± 6 looper eggs per plant, compared to 213 ± 25 for the 54671 parent and 17 ± 4 for PI 274372. Two F2 populations varied widely in plant damage inflicted by the resulting larvae when they were exposed to 4 releases of adult loopers but the damage distribution was skewed towards the resistant parent. Antixenosis of 16 F3 progenies was independent of plant size (r ranged from 0.02 to 0.52) and of plant type (r ranged from 0.00 to 0.57).

Open Access