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  • Author or Editor: D. Kean x
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Abstract

Segregation for annual vs. biennial flowering habit was observed in F2 progenies from crosses of early and late-maturing broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. Italica Group) inbred lines with cabbage (B. oleracea L. Capitata Group), kohlrabi (B. oleracea L. Gongyloides Group), collards (B. oleracea L. Acephala Group), kale (B. oleracea L. Acephala Group), and brussels sprouts (B. oleracea L. Gemmifera Group). F, progenies were usually completely annual. F2 progenies from crosses involving late broccoli contained two to five times as many biennials as F2 progenies from early broccoli crosses. Maturity factors carried by the biennial parents also appeared to affect expression of flowering habit. Annual habit is dominant over biennial and is controlled by several major genes with a strong effect of modifiers from both the annual and biennial parent. Time of heading of annual plants in F2 progenies appeared to be controlled by quantitative, mainly additive, factors. Distribution of heading dates for the F1 and annual broccoli parents showed a large environmental or cultural effect. It appears that the biennial parents, especially brussels sprouts and collards, contributed strong factors for late maturity.

Open Access
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Abstract

Seven breeding lines of peas (Pisum sativum L.), OSU 547-29, OSU 559-6, OSU 564-3, OSU 584-16, OSU 589- 12, OSU 615-15, and OSU 620-1, resistant to pea seedborne mosaic virus (PSbMV) and pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) have been released by the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station. The lines resulted from three cycles of breeding to transfer pea seedborne mosaic virus resistance from PI lines to commercially usable peas. They have horticultural type approaching that of commercial cultivars, and all have good field resistance to pea enation mosaic virus. The development of cultivars resistant to PSbMV should relieve the pea seed industry of the restrictions and expenses involved in avoidance of PSbMV contamination of seed supplies.

Open Access
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Abstract

Height reduction of sweet corn (Zea mays L.) plants by head smut [Sphacelotheca reiliana (Kuhn) Clinton] was measured in four field studies using seed furrow inoculation. Infected plants were consistently stunted whether sori occurred on the ears only or on ears and tassels. There was a significant relationship between plant height and infection of individual plants. Difference in mean height between plants later determined to be infected or non-infected was measurable 5 weeks after planting and increased steadily until growth ceased. This suggested the possibility of elimination of weaker plants in segregating populations before maturity. Mean height reduction of individual hybrids and inbred lines ranged from 7% to 65% of the height of non-infected plants, with an average of ≍30% reduction for all cultivars. Correlations between mean percent height reduction and disease incidence of cultivars were variable and generally low, ranging from r = −0.34 to 0.17. This suggested that degree of height reduction would be a poor indicator of the susceptibility of a cultivar to infection.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘Marbles’ and ‘Riot’ are dwarf peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) developed at Corvallis, Ore. on the research farms of the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station. They bear prolific crops of attractive, brightly colored fruit on a compact plant, and are suitable for culture as bedding plants to provide fall color in the landscape.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘Oregon 523’, a pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivar of commercial freezing type, was bred for resistance to pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) in the Willamette Valley of western Oregon. In this area, a normally heavy natural disease incidence permits annual selection for field resistance to PEMV. and also resistance to red clover vein mosaic virus (RCVMV), a prevalent virus that can cause severe damage in PEMV resistant peas. Because ‘Oregon 523’ has good field resistance to PEMV and RCVMV, it is expected to be more reliable in production than many cultivars when these diseases are present. It has shown acceptable quality and adequate yield for use by the western Oregon pea processing industry.

Open Access
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Abstract

Fifteen broccoli (Brassica oleraceae L. Italica Group) breeding lines, OSU 101–OSU 115, have been released for use by commercial breeders. Favorable combining ability has been shown by various experimental hybrid combinations among these lines and between these lines and clubroot resistant Oregon State Univ. (OSU) lines released concurrently and described separately (2). This group of lines includes a range of characteristics which should be useful for breeding or direct use in F1 hybrids, including upright growth habit with good head exsertion for efficient harvest, excellent blue-green color, deeply branched heads, desirable bud type, earliness, and some resistance to downy mildew.

Open Access
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Abstract

Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. Italica Group) breeding lines OSU CR-2 to OSU CR-8 were selected and tested for clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Wor.) resistance in the field at Corvallis and Tillamook, Oregon. All of the lines have shown resistance to downy mildew [Peronospora parasitica (Fr.) Tul.] in the field at Corvallis, and most have useful horticultural characteristics and are potentially useful as parents for F1 hybrids.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘Gold Nugget’ is a determinate, fruitful tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cultivar, bearing golden colored cherry-type tomatoes, resembling ‘Yellow Plum’ in flavor. It was developed for home gardeners in western Oregon under cool summer conditions where it is early maturing and has a strong tendency for seedless fruit.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

'Oregon Spring' and 'Santiam' are early maturing, Verticillium wilt-resistant tomatoes with compact growth habit and medium-large fruit that are mostly seedless. The cultivars differ in fruit size and maturity. 'Oregon Spring' bears fruits that are larger than those of 'Santiam', but ripen about 5 days later. They should be especially useful in cool-summer areas where seedlessness and relative earliness will be maximized. 'Oregon Spring' and 'Santiam' will be most useful for home garden, roadside stand, and limited local market, since they lack the fruit firmness required for commercial handling.

Open Access