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  • Author or Editor: D. H. Steinegger x
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Abstract

Bensulide [0,0-diisopropyl phosphorodithioate S ester with N-2-mercaptoethyl) benzenesulfonamide] at 13.6 kg/ha reduced sod transplant rooting of ‘Park’, ‘Merion’, and ‘Baron’ Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) when applied either to sod or sodbed. Prosulfalin [N-[[4-(dipropylamino)-3,5-dinitrophenyl] -S,S -dimethylysulfilimine] at 2.3 kg/ha applied to the sodbed reduced sod transplant rooting of ‘Park’ and ‘Baron’. Benefin (N-butyl-N-ethyl-α,α,α-trifluoro-2,6-dinitro-p-toluidine) at 2.3 kg/ha reduced rooting of ‘Baron’ when applied to the sodbed. Sod transplant rooting of ‘Baron’ was significantly reduced by siduron [l-(2-methylcyclohexyl)-3-phenylurea] at 13.6 kg/ha, oxadiazon [2-tert-butyl-4-(2,4-dichloro-5-isopropyoxyphenyl)-△2-1,3,4-oxadizolin-5-one] at 4.6 kg/ha, prosulfalin at 2.3 kg/ha, and benefin at 2.3 kg/ha when applied to sod prior to transplanting. ‘Merion’ and ‘Park’ were not influenced by these treatments. Regardless of herbicide treatment, ‘Baron’ had a lower sod transplant rooting strength when compared to ‘Park’ and ‘Merion’.

Open Access

Abstract

Veronica repens was evaluated in a field study comparing herbicide effects on ground cover establishment. Herbicides were applied 1 day before ground covers were transplanted. Ground cover transplant root systems were either dipped or not dipped in an activated charcoal slurry prior to planting. There was a significant interaction between herbicide and charcoal treatment. Dichlobenil, chlorsulfuron, and simazine caused significant injury and reduced surface coverage. Transplants dipped in activated charcoal and treated with dichlobenil or chlorsulfuron had as much as three times less injury and produced 24% greater surface coverage than those without activated charcoal. DCPA, oxadiazon, and trifluralin caused little herbicide injury or ground cover stand reduction, and activated charcoal preconditioning did not influence their responses. These results indicate a broad herbicide range could be used with the activated charcoal root system dip procedure during Veronica repens establishment. Chemical names used: dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA), 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (dichlobenil); 2-chloro-N-[[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino]carbonyl]benzenesulfonamide (chlorsulfuron); 3-[2,4-dichloro-5-(1-methyle-thoxy)phenyl]-5-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2(3H)-one (oxadiazon); 6-chloro-N, N’-diethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (simazine); α,α,α-trifluoro-2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-p-toluidine (trifluralin).

Open Access

Abstract

A cultivar and blend trial of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) demonstrated differential cultivar responses to larval infestation and injury by bluegrass billbug (Sphenophorus parvulus Gyllenhal). Correlation between billbug injury ratings and billbug larval density was r = 0.92. Injury ratings and larval density for blends approximated mean response for cultivars in pure stands. These results suggested that blending could be beneficial in reducing injury symptoms, if appropriate cultivars were selected.

Open Access

Abstract

Oat straw mulch reduced plant production and quality. Turfgrass clipping mulch produced 2.5 times the fresh plant weight of the no mulch treatment and 5 times that of the oat straw mulch. All mulches reduced weeds when compared to no mulch. Alfalfa hay and turfgrass clippings were more effective than oat straw. Water vapor loss and soil temperatures were reduced by the mulches. Soil moisture beneath the oat straw was less than the other mulches. Oat straw had the lowest N content but did not reflect lower N in plants growing in it. Kentucky bluegrass mulch ranked best of the species tested, perennial ryegrass was second. While, tall fescue, fine fescue, and buffalograss were intermediate in ranking. Creeping bentgrass gave the poorest performance and ranked the same as the no mulch treatment.

Open Access

Abstract

Twenty-one Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) cultivais differed significantly in their thatching tendency during 4 years of study. ‘Glade’, ‘Cheri’, and ‘Victa’ accumulated the most thatch, while ‘S-21’, ‘A-34’, and ‘Park’ accumulated the least. Increasing mowing heights from 2.5 cm to 5.0 cm significantly increased the tendency to accumulate thatch. Increasing nitrogen nutritional levels from 10 g m−2 to 20 g m−2 did not increase thatching tendency.

Open Access