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  • Author or Editor: Conrad B. Link x
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Abstract

Encyclopedias and dictionaries of Horticulture are important sources of information for the amateur and the professional. For the non-professional it is one of the first places to seek horticultural information in a condensed form. Several encyclopedias and dictionaries have been published specifically for the non-technical reader while others with more technical information are intended for both the professional and amateur horticulturist. However, one of the problems is that of being current and up to date. In horticulture we recognize that there are some things that are basic, not changing or only slowly but in others there is rapid change.

Open Access

Abstract

Field studies conducted during 1967 and 1968 evaluated activated carbon as an adsorbent for the reduction of dichlobenil (2, 6-dichlorobenzitrile) plant toxicity occurring in newly established nursery plantings. Eight lb. per acre of dichlobenil was a critical level for plant toxicity control through root dips of activated carbon since visual injury was often pronounced where dichlobenil was increased above this rate. Increases in the activated carbon dip concn did not enhance plant protection. Activated carbon dips are most effective where herbicide injury is expected to be marginal and when residues will rapidly dissipate from the soil immediately surrounding a plant’s developing root system.

Open Access

Abstract

Five species of ornamental plants growing in a media containing 113.4 g and 226.8 g of Osmocote “18-6-12” (18.0-2.7-10.0, N-P-K) per 35.2 liters of artificial growing media produced a total top growth equal to plants receiving 100 to 150 ppm of N at each irrigation from a liquidsoluble fertilizer (25.0-4.4-8.4, N-P-K). Higher levels of Osmocote did not result in a significant increase in growth.

Open Access

Abstract

Soil drenches of alpha-cyclopropyl-alpha-(p-methoxyphenyl)-5-pyrimidinemethanol (ancymidol) were applied 2 weeks after planting to Brassaia actinophylla Endl., X Fatshedera lizei (Cochet) Guillaum, Philodendron scandens Subsp. oxycardium (Schott) Bunt., and Tradescantia fluminensis Vell, at concentrations of 0. 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/15 cm pot to retard their growth and elongation while growing in a greenhouse under specific acclimatization procedures. Several months later the plants were placed in a controlled environment room under variable artificial light intensities (270, 540, 1080 lux) and after a 6-week period were evaluated as decorative materials. All plants treated with ancymidol, except Brassaia, showed decreased internodal length, were more compact in growth habit and displayed more intense color than those untreated. Ancymidol treatments maintained the decrease in internodal length at all light intensities for Tradescantia, Philodendron and Fatshedera with the greatest decrease evident at the highest (1.0 mg/pot) concentration. Only Brassaia exhibited leaf drop and no phytotoxicity was noted on any ancymidol treated plants.

Open Access

Abstract

Several film forming antitranspirants were applied to salable, flowering chrysanthemum plants prior to placement in a controlled environment devised to simulate the interior of a home. Significant reductions in water loss resulted with all applications, with over a 40% reduction at highest concentrations. No discernable increase in floral display life was observed with any treatment. Higher concentrations of chemicals caused yellowing of foliage, and in some cases imparted a sticky residue or in some way impeded normal floral expansion. Film effectiveness persisted for at least 2 weeks with consistantly high transpiration losses for non-treated plants.

Open Access

Abstract

A study was made of the flowering response of 2 test plants to various light treatments during a period of cold storage vernalization. Leaf-bearing plants of the obligate cold-requiring species Ajuga reptans and leafy plants of 2 cultivars of the facultative cold-requiring species Dianthus caryophyllus were subjected to differences of intensity, quality and duration of light during a 30-day period of storage at 4°C. Flowering response was measured by earliness of budding, per cent of plants flowering and number of leaf pairs initiated before the reproductive bud was formed. Light applied during the cold period was shown to increase the degree of vernalization obtained. Increases in light intensity resulted in earlier and increased flowering. Differences in photoperiod and light quality, however, were not shown to influence the flowering response.

Open Access

Abstract

Three film-forming antitranspirants were applied to potted chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.) under greenhouse conditions from the time of potting rooted cuttings to saleable size. Folicote (a hydrocarbon wax emulsion of essentially fully refined paraffin) reduced water loss by an average of 39% and by as much as 65%, but generally detracted from plant appearance, delayed flowering, depressed fresh and dry weight, decreased flower size, increased height and reduced leaf area. While Clear Spray (a lateral based emulsion of undefined composition) and Wilt Pruf NCF (whose active ingredient is a polyterpene compound, Pinolene) reduced water loss 8 and 11% respectively, their side effects were less deleterious and, in a few cases, beneficial. Effects of antitranspirants under summer greenhouse conditions appeared to be of a greater magnitude than during a cooler season of the year.

Open Access