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Amy F. Iezzoni and Colleen A. Mulinix

Yield components were measured from 115 sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) hybrid seedlings from 13 full-sib families to investigate the potential of breeding for increased yield. Those families with the highest number of fruit and reproductive buds had the highest yields. In general, increased fruit size was not able to compensate for low fruit count. Fruit set and flower count per bud were inversely related, suggesting compensation between these two components. Yield components from six selections chosen for differing fruiting habits were measured for an additional 2 years. In year 1, those selections with a majority of their fruit on l-year-old wood had higher yield efficiencies (yield per branch cross-sectional area) than those with fruit on spurs; however, but year 3, the higher-yielding selections were those that fruited primarily on spurs. The data are discussed relative to selecting for yield in a sour cherry breeding program.

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Amy F. Iezzoni and Colleen A. Mulinix

Bloom times were evaluated for seedlings from four full-sib and 14 open-pollinated families of sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.). Time of anthesis for individual seedlings ranged over 17and 16-day periods in 1989 and 1990, respectively. In both years, most seedlings bloomed later than `Montmorency', the only commercially important sour cherry cultivar in the United States. `Pitic de Iasi', the parent of the latest-blooming family, is a natural interspecific hybrid between sour cherry and the cold-hardy Russian ground cherry (P. fruticosa Pall.). Hybridization between sour and ground cherry and intense selection pressure in the colder areas of the sour cherry habitat may have favored selection of the late-blooming character.

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Christopher M. Long, Colleen A. Mulinix and Amy F. Iezzoni

Microspore-derived callus cultures were obtained by anther culture of `Emperor Francis' sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.). Branches were removed from the field in January and March and forced in the laboratory. When the microspores reached the uninucleate stage, anthers were placed on modified Quoirin and Lepoivre liquid culture medium containing 4.4 μm BA and 4.5 μm 2,4-D. After ≈60 days, callus that emerged from the anthers was placed on woody plant medium supplemented with 1 μm 2,4-D and 3 μm 2iP and routinely transferred. The resulting 270 callus cultures were screened for two allozymes heterozygous in `Emperor Francis', Pgi-2 and 6-Pgd-1. Of the 270 callus cultures, 154 expressed only one allele each for Pgi-2 and 6-Pgd-1; thus, they were considered microspore-derived. The microspore-derived callus cultures can be used as a linkage mapping population. Chemical names used: 6-benzyladenine (BA); 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D); N6-(2-isopentenyl)-adenine (2iP).