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  • Author or Editor: Clyde E. Evans x
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Abstract

Different rates of N, P, and K on southernpea Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. grown for one-time harvest during 4 years in field experiments on Alaga sand (Typic Quartzipsamments) soil showed that N had the greatest effect on yield of mature green southernpeas. Pea yields increased to a maximum of 67 kg/ha of N. Soil test P ranged from high to extremely high in the untreated soil; therefore, fertilizer P did not affect yield. Yields were increased by K only in the location-year in which soil-test K was low. At 35 days there was an increase in leaf N concentration as the rates of N were increased from 34 to 101 kg/ha; at 49 days the N concentration was lower and was not affected by N rates. Increasing fertilizer rates of K increased leaf concentration of K at both 35 and 49 days. Fertilizer P did not affect N, P, or K concentration.

Open Access

Abstract

Gardenia jasminoides Ellis and Ilex crenata Thunb. ‘Compacta’ were field-grown with 4 irrigation rates based on 0%, 25%, 50%, and 100% replacement of net evaporation from a class A pan. Irrigated gardenia were larger than nonirrigated gardenia, and those grown with 50% and 100% replacement of net evaporation had greater total root growth than nonirrigated plants. Root number, root dry weight, and fibrous root number in a 20-cm rootball were generally greater with irrigated plants than nonirrigated plants. Ilex crenata shoot growth was greater also with irrigation versus nonirrigation. Based on this data, 25% replacement of net evaporation resulted in plants of both species being similar to higher irrigation rates.

Open Access

Abstract

Boston fern [Nephrolepsis exaltata (L.) Schott ‘Compacta’] was grown with 3 rates of 2 slow-release fertilizers and with one rate of liquid fertilization. Greatest fern dry weight occurred with ferns grown with liquid fertilization (20N–0.8P–16.6K) or Osmocote (19N–2.5P–8.3K) at the 1.8 kg N/m3 rate. After 16 weeks of simulated commercial production, one-third of the ferns were moved to a low-light interior environment, while one-third were held in the greenhouse. Six weeks later, ferns moved to the interior environment were greener in color, had greater nutrient content, and exhibited less growth than did ferns held in the greenhouse.

Open Access

Abstract

Nephrolepsis exaltata (L.) Schott cv. Rooseveltii was grown with 3 fertilizer rates (50, 150, and 300 ppm N) applied as 20N-8.7P-16.7K fertilizer at 3 frequencies (1, 2, and 3 times weekly). Plant dry weight and frond number were similar for ferns receiving 150 ppm N, 2 or 3 times weekly, and 300 ppm N, 3 times weekly. Ferns treated with 300 ppm N, 2 or 3 times a week, had a greater concentration of tissue N and were greener than ferns treated with 150 ppm N, 2 or 3 times weekly, or ferns treated with 300 ppm N, once weekly. P and K tissue concentrations were similar for all treatments with the exception of ferns treated with 50 ppm N.

Open Access

Abstract

Of various controlled-release fertilizer materials, tested on African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha H. Wendl) at 300, 600, and 900 kg/ha for leachate soluble salts, Ca, P, K, and Mg and plant injury, Scott 25.0–4.4–8.3 gave the best result and Scott 15.0–8.7–4.2 gave the poorest result. Precise 8.0–4.8–4.2 leachate generally contained more Ca and Mg and lower leachate soluble salts, but was lower in P and K than the other fertilizers. With the exception of Precise, the leachate soluble salts of most of the fertilizers was initially (10th irrigation) too high. The 900 kg/ha rates for some fertilizers caused high leachate soluble salts and plant injury.

Open Access