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  • Author or Editor: Clinton F. Hodges x
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Abstract

The occupations rilled by students receiving a BS degree in Horticulture are many and varied. Of particular interest is the changing nature of these occupations in recent years. At one time, production oriented curricula sufficed for the vast majority of horticulture students. Today’s occupations, however, require a student to have a broad background in such areas as business, management, economics, education, and sociology. It is not rare in today’s agricultural job market to find employers who may wish to hire a horticulturist, but may relegate his knowledge of horticulture to a position secondary to that of business knowledge, or some other specialty. The changing nature of employment from the predominantly production oriented jobs of some years ago has also resulted in pressures upon the academic world to constantly re-evaluate horticulture curricula and re-tailor it to a rapidly changing job market.

Open Access

Abstract

The relative sensitivity of various organs of Poa pratensis L. ‘Merion’ (Kentucky bluegrass) to osmotically induced water stress was evaluated. Lateral bud meristems (axillary buds) were most sensitive to increases in osmotic pressure. The decrease in lateral bud development subsequently resulted in a decrease in tiller and rhizome numbers. Relative growth rates of various organs of Kentucky bluegrass further established that shoot dry-matter loss in response to water stress was due primarily to decreased tiller and rhizome growth. The effect of increasing osmotic pressure had relatively similar and less severe effects on leaf and root growth. The potential use of relative growth for characterizing growth responses to water stress is discussed.

Open Access

Abstract

Photosynthesis was measured in excised cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Marketer) cotyledons subjected to chilling temperatures in the presence or absence of photo synthetically active radiation (PAR), under conditions that precluded water stress. Cotyledon CO2 exchange rates (CER) were reduced after chilling in the light, but not after chilling in the dark. In the light, reduction occurred more rapidly at lower than at higher chilling temperatures. The level of PAR had little or no effect on CER reductions at lower temperatures within the chilling range, but at higher chilling temperatures, reduction occurred more rapidly at higher PAR levels. Recovery of photosynthesis following chilling in the light occurred more rapidly in the dark than in the light, and this difference in recovery rate was greater with longer exposure to light and chilling conditions. The removal of light during the recovery phase accelerated the rate of recovery to a level comparable to the dark control.

Open Access