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Clarence Johnson Jr.

Most horticultural students at Fort Valley State College (1890 land grant college) have little or no background in aspects of horticultural marketing. We offer a course in Marketing Technology to address this lack of background in horticultural marketing. In this course, students learn how to obtain a business license and a tax number. The significance of financial planning is stressed through practice. Students learn the strategies involved in merchandising and pricing, the proper display techniques, and the importance of advertising. Field-trips to local horticultural businesses allow for students to interact with professionals in horticulture. Students are required to do reports on each field-trip taken in the course.

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Clarence Johnson Jr.

Spraying 9-month-old UC157F1 asparagus plants (Asparagus officinalis L.) with aqueous solutions of GA4/7, BA, and promalin ranging from 0 to 200 ppm in 200-ppm increments and using the mother-stalk method showed that BA continued to produce the most marketable shoots and obtained a higher level of effectveness. GA4/7 showed significance on several days during the harvest period. On the final day, there was no significant difference found for either GA4/7 or promalin. BA produced marketable shoots earlier than promalin, but in the end, both these chemicals were equally effective. Early interaction with GA4/7 × BA resulted in delayed shoot emergence. Promalin is a mixture of GA4/7 and BA.

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Clarence Johnson Jr.

Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis)plants were sprayed and drenched with different concentrations of Promalin (0, 250, and 500 ppm) The varieties for the spraying experiment were `Mary Washington', `Emeral', `UC-157-F1', and `UC157F2'. Six replications for each treatment were used in a randomized complete-block design. The drenching experiment used two varieties (Mary Washington and UC-157-F2) with six replications of each treatment in a randomized complete-block design. Pots were numbered and labeled for each experimental unit. Plants (ferns) were counted and recorded in order to obtain the initial number of ferns before or after the spraying or drenching. In the spraying experiment, the plants were sprayed to run-off using a hand sprayer whereas; in the drenching experiment, 1000 mL or 1 L of the solution was used to drench each plant. The response to the chemical was measured in two ways: weekly stimulation of emergence of new-shoots and percent increase in final number of shoots over the initial number. In the spraying treatments differences were not found among the treatments used. In the drenching experiment with `Mary Washington' variety, a lower initial number of ferns at 250 ppm as compared to the 0 ppm of Promalin (8.82 to13.00) was observed. Differences for `Mary Washington' variety was not found for cumulative number of ferns on weeks 1, 2, and 3. However, the percent increase in number of ferns was higher for the 250 ppm as compared to the 0 ppm (174.55% to 78.14%). `UC-157-F2' showed no difference among the different concentrations. This indicates a difference in varietal response.

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Sauveur Mahotiere and Clarence Johnson Jr.

Mary Washington, UC157F1, and UC157F2 asparagus cultivars were grown from 1-year-old crown under greenhouse conditions in 30-liter pots containing Pro-Mix medium. The roots were cut to 10 cm prior to planting on 12 Feb. 1991. On July 12, 1991 the plants were transferred outdoors and sprayed with BA, GA4/7 and Promalin at 400 mg. liter-1 using tap water as control. On July 16, 1991 the treated ferns were cut at ground level and the plants were returned to the greenhouse, and arranged in a RCB design. Seven reps with one pot/rep were used. Data on time of emergence of first shoots were recorded daily until all pots had produced at least 1 shoot. When all plants had sprouted, cumulative number of all shoots/pots was recorded weekly thereafter over 5 weeks. BA and Promalin reduced time of emergence of shoots and increased the number of shoots/plant. GA4/7 had no effect on shoot emergence or shoot number.

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Charles Magee, Johnny Carter, and Clarence Johnson Jr

During the summer of 1988, a study was conducted to determine the effect of an inexpensive reusable styrofoam container on the percent weight loss in collards (bunch and head) after 30 days in a walk-in cooler. This container was designed and constructed for precooling, shipping, and storing fruits and vegetables. The insulated container was provided with a lid-mounted ice cavity that was removable and could be replaced through an access door without removing the lid. The ice cavity melted and was dispersed throughout the container onto the collards. The three treatments used in this study were (1) no top (2) top without ice, and (3) top with ice. Results indicated that both the bunches and heads responded similarly to treatments. The top with ice treatment significantly reduced percent weight loss when compared to the other treatments (top no ice and no top).