Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Chung-Ruey Yen x
Clear All Modify Search

Fruit growth curves of three longan varieties showed single sigmoid. Seed was the major sink in longan at early fruit development. Aril grew only after seed had approached full development. Early `Yangtaoyeh' grew more rapidly than two later varieties. Desweeting, levels of aril total soluble solids (TSS) increased to maximum and then declined gradually at later fruit development, occurs often in longan. Variation of desweeting rate among varieties was significant. Increases of fruit weight during desweeting (from dates of maximum TSS to end of experiment) were 55.4%, 50.9%, and 7.3% for `Yangtaoyeh', `Fenko', and `Shihyueh', respectively. Periods of water contents increase in aril coincided with the changes of fruit weight of three varieties. Dilution of TSS by water inflow was one of major factor of desweeting in longan fruit. Girdling did not slow down decline of aril total soluble solids.

Free access

Distribution of radiolabeled assimilates was examined at various intervals after 1 hour of light or dark 14CO2 fixation by leaves or developing fruit of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) so that the fate of assimilates from each source could be assessed at sequential stages of fruit growth. Exported products of both light and dark 14CO2 fixation in leaves were deposited primarily in juice tissues of fruit even during periods of substantial dry weight accumulation by peel. Fruit photosynthesis, however, gave rise to assimilates that remained almost entirely in the peel (flavedo and albedo) even 7 days later, regardless of dry matter increases by other tissues. Products of dark 14CO2 fixation by intact fruit were recovered in all tissues but predominated in the peel of young fruit vs. juice tissues at later stages of growth. Comparison of dry matter gains and 14C-labeled assimilate distribution indicated that fruit photosynthesis likely contributed substantially to development of peel but not juice sacs. Data on dark 14CO2 fixation were consistent with its suggested involvement in organic acid synthesis by juice sacs.

Free access

Yellow pitaya, Selenicereus megalanthus (Schum. ex. Vaupel) Moran, is a potential new fruit in Taiwan. It sprouts mostly in winter and flowers in late spring and fall. In this study, an average of 60% shoots within canopies flowered. Shoots sprouted in the current winter flowered in fall and produced winter fruits, and shoots sprouted earlier than the current winter flowered in late spring and produced summer fruits. Floral buds on most shoots appeared at the distal end. The weight, pulp percentage, and total soluble solids of winter fruits were significantly higher than those of summer fruits. The number of black seeds was positively correlated with pulp weight (R 2 = 0.87). The total soluble solids in the core region of winter fruits reached 22.7 °Brix, higher than that in other regions. Future efforts to improve yellow pitaya production in Taiwan include increasing winter fruit production by enhancing growth of the current year's new shoots through proper canopy management and increasing the size of summer fruit by artificial pollination, fruit thinning, and other means.

Free access

Red pitaya (Hylocereus sp.), which flowers between May and October and sprouts between November and May in Taiwan, has been confirmed to be a long-day plant. The areoles on the old shoots may be induced to flower after the March equinox naturally, and the floral bud formation occurs in two to three waves from May to October. We conducted experiments on photoperiodic regulation of floral bud formation from June to Dec. 2009 and tested the feasibility of off-season production in 2011. Shortening summer daylength to 8 h inhibited the areoles at the distal end of the shoots to develop into floral buds and promoted sprouting at the proximal ends of the shoots. Night-breaking treatment between the September equinox and the winter solstice led to floral bud formation. The critical daylength seemed to be ≈12 h, and night-breaking treatment would be applicable between the September and the next March equinoxes to produce off-season crops. The duration of night-breaking required for flower differentiation was longer in the cooler than in the warmer season. Four weeks of night-breaking treatment was sufficient to promote flowering in late fall (mid-October to mid-November), but 3 months were required to generate similar result in the winter and early spring (January to March) in southern Taiwan.

Free access