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  • Author or Editor: Chi Won Lee x
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Abstract

In a survey of 49 cultivars of muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), 12 had bitter seedlings and 37 were non-bitter. Bitterness was shown to be controlled by a single dominant gene designated Bi/bi in crosses of bitter ‘Honey Dew’ and the non-bitter ‘Wheat City’ and ‘Queen of Colorado’.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Spraying with (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) to increase femaleness in andromonoecious muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) increased hybrid seed production under natural field crossing from 12.0% to 27.4% in ‘Wheat City’ and from 4.0% to 51.5% in ‘Queen of Colorado’. A dominant seedling marker (Bi) in ‘Honey Dew’, the pollinator for both crosses, was used to identify hybrid seed.

Open Access

Abstract

Apical shoot tips and axillary buds of buffalo gourd (Cucurbita foetidissima HBK.) when cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 4.4-22.2 μm (1-5 mg/liter) BA and 0-0.54 μM (0-0.1 mg/liter) NAA produced 4-9 multiple shoots within 4 weeks. The individual shoots subcultured on MS medium containing 4.9 μm (1 mg/liter) IBA produced a healthy root system in 4 weeks. Rooted cultures were successfully transferred to soil in a greenhouse. Chemical names used. BA:N-(phenylmethyl)-1H-purin-6-amine. NAA:l-naphthaleneacetic acid. IBA: lH-indole-3-butanoic acid.

Open Access

Abstract

Shoot tips and stem nodes of Asclepias erosa Torr., cultured on a modified (0.5 × major salts) Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing 0.54 µm (0.1 mg/liter) NAA and 44.4 µm (10 mg/liter) BA, produced multiple shoots in 5 weeks. Subcultures of the individual shoots on the same medium produced 5-12 new shoots 4 weeks later. Rooting of the resultant shoots was best accomplished by preculturing them for 48 hr on MS medium containing 246 or 492 µm (50 or 100 mg/liter) IB A prior to subculturing for 4 weeks on MS medium devoid of growth regulators. The rooted cultures were established successfully in soil. Chemical names used. NAA: 1-naphthaleneacetic acid. BA:N-(phenylmethyl)-lH-purin-6-amine. IBA: lH-indole-3-butanoic acid.

Open Access

Ageratum and salvia were grown in hydroponic solutions containing either NH4 +, NO3 -, or both NH4 + and NO3 - with or without Cl- to study changes in solution pH and ion uptake rate. pH of both NH4 + and NH4 + + NO3 - solutions was steadily decreased as time passed. A drop in pH front 6.50 to 3.57 within 3 days was recorded with NH4 +. The pH changes were also affected by the presence of Cl-. The NO3 - treatment maintained its initial solution pH over time regardless of the presence of Cl-. pH change by ageratum was greater than that by salvia, especially when plants were in NH4 + + NO3 - solution. N uptake was maximum in NH4 + + NO3 - solution with Cl-. Uptake of NO3 - was suppressed by NH4 +, but NH4 + uptake was not affected by NO3 -. NH4 + and NO3 - counteracted each other in influencing the Cl- uptake. Uptake of other ion was also affected by plant species as well as N source and Cl-. In ageratum transpiration rate was lowered by Cl- in both NH4 + and NO3 - treatments.

Free access

This study was carried out to determine the interaction among NH4 +, NO3 -, and Cl- ion uptake and to find the causes of NH4 + -related toxicity symptoms in plants fed with NH4 + as a sole nitrogen source. Seedling plants established in peat-lite and rockwool media were fed with nutrient solutions containing either NH4 + or NO3 - or both NH4 + plus NO3 - with or without Cl-. Plants grown with NH4 + + Cl- contained the highest levels of Cl-. Plants fed with NO3 - + Cl- also showed high levels of Cl- in the tissue. The growth and tissue Cl- contents of plants fed with NH4 + were not affected by changes in Cl- concentration in the nutrient solution. Plants fed with NH4 + that was ion-balanced by high levels of SO4 2- plus low or no Cl- still developed the NH4 + -related toxicity symptoms. This indicates that NH4 + -related toxicity symptoms occur independently of Cl-. It was also shown that the activity of Cl-, a counterion for NH4 + uptake, was suppressed by NO3 -.

Free access

Abstract

Double eye (DE) and single eye (SE) nodal semihardwood cuttings of jojoba [Simmondsia chinensis (Link) Schneider] treated with 2000 ppm indolebutyric acid were rooted successfully under intermittent mist in a mixture of 1 perlite : 1 vermiculite. Differences in rooting percentages between 5-node, single node DE, and single node SE cuttings were not significant. The root systems of 5-node cuttings were much larger than those of nodal cuttings, and DE cuttings produced significantly more roots than SE cuttings. Clonal differences for rooting capability were evident among 12 clones tested; percentage of rooting varied from 30 to 97 for DE cuttings and from 43 to 95 for SE cuttings. Significantly more cuttings rooted in the 1 perlite: 1 vermiculite rooting mix than in Oasis Root Cubes.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Beersheva’ suaeda (Suaeda vera Forssk.), Chenopodiaceae, was released by the Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station to provide a salt-tolerant, drought-tolerant, bright green, perennial groundcover adapted to the arid southwestern United States and similar regions of the world.

Open Access

Abstract

Arizona rosewood (Vauquelinia californica Torr). Rosaceae, is native to southern Arizona and northern Mexico at elevations of 750 to 1500 m (1). ‘Molino’ and ‘Tonto’ Arizona rosewood were released by the Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station to provide evergreen, drought-tolerant, flowering shrubs adapted to the low and medium deserts of the southwestern United States and similar regions of the world.

Open Access

Abstract

Softwood stem cuttings of Arizona rosewood (Vauquelinia californica Torr.) rooted in 2 months in a mixture of 1 vermiculite and 1 perlite when grown under mist. The rooting percentages (0-95%) and the number of roots per cutting varied by clone and month. Rooting percentage was higher in May than in April, June, or July. Treatments of 4000-8000 ppm indolebutyric acid (IB A) enhanced rooting in some clones but not in others.

Open Access