Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Charles A. Conover x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Richard T. Poole and Charles A. Conover

Three factorial experiments with various combinations of N, P or K were conducted over 3 years with Schlumbergera truncata (Haw.) Moran. Blooming was influenced by fertilization. Number of blooms was reduced by both low and high fertilization. Nitrogen appeared to be the most influential element, with high levels decreasing time to bloom and number of blooms. Potassium had no effect, and an increase in phosphorus decreased time to bloom and number of blooms.

Free access

Trinidad Reyes, Terril A. Nell, James E. Barrett, and Charles A. Conover

The effect of irradiance and fertilizer level on the acclimatization of Chamaedorea elegans Mart. was studied. Chamaedorea elegans was grown for 4 months in 1.6-liter pots under 162, 306, or 564 μmol·m–2·s–1 and fertilized weekly with 20N–4.7P–16.6K soluble fertilizer at 220, 440, or 880 mg/pot. At the end of the production period, plants were moved to interior rooms and maintained for 2 months at 20 μmol·m–2·s–1 for 12 h daily at 21 ± 1C and a relative humidity of 50% ± 5%. At the end of the production phase, the light compensation point (LCP) and the concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates were lower, and chlorophyll concentration was higher the lower the irradiance level. Increasing fertilizer concentration decreased the number of fronds, LCP, and nonstructural carbohydrates. After 2 months in the interior environment, LCP and number of fronds of C. elegans did not differ among treatments. Chlorophyll concentration of plants grown under 564 μmol·m–2·s–1 had increased 61%, while starch in the stem had decreased 43% relative to the concentration found at the end of the production period. In C. elegans grown under 306 μmol·m–2·s–1, stem starch depletion was only 13% during the interior evaluation period. These results indicated that C. elegans grown under the highest irradiance level used reserved carbohydrates in the interior environment while adjusting to low light and producing new leaves. Chamaedorea elegans was best acclimatized at the intermediate irradiance and medium fertilizer concentration.

Free access

Trinidad Reyes, Terril A. Nell, Charles A. Conover, and James E. Barrett

Effects of three light intensities (564, 306 and 162 μmol m-2 s-1) and three fertilizer rates (220, 440 and 880 mg/15 cm pot, weekly) were evaluated on acclimatization potential of Chamaedorea elegans. Treatments were applied during four months under greenhouse conditions after which plants were placed indoors (20 μmol m-2 s-1, 21±2C and 50% RH) for two months. Light compensation point (LCP) was significantly reduced by decreasing light intensity and increasing fertilizer rates. Leaf and root fresh and dry weights increased with irradiance while shoots were not affected. Chlorophyll a levels were higher in plants grown under the lowest light intensity. Carbohydrate content is being analyzed and anatomical examination of leaves studied. Plant performance indoors will be discussed. These studies demonstrate that Chamaedorea, a monocot, acclimatizes similarly to dicots.

Free access

Trinidad Reyes, Terril A. Nell, James E. Barrett, and Charles A. Conover

This experiment was conducted to evaluate the interior performance of Chrysalidocarpus lutescens grown for 8 months under 481, 820, and 1241 μmol·m–2·s–1 and fertilized weekly with a 20N–4.7P–16.6K soluble fertilizer at 440, 880, and 1660 mg/pot. Afterwards, plants were placed indoors and maintained at 20 μmol·m–2·s–1 for 12 h daily at 21±1C and a relative humidity of 50%±5% for 3 months. At the end of the production phase, light compensation point (LCP) varied from 243 μmol·m–2·s–1 at the high irradiance level to 140 μmol·m–2·s–1 at the lowest one. Chlorophyll concentration in the leaves was not affected by irradiance or fertilizer rate. Starch concentration in stems and roots were higher the lower the fertilizer rate applied during production and the higher the irradiance level. After 3 months indoors, LCP declined for all the treatments, but the lowest LCP reached, 126 μmol·m–2·s–1, was still too high if the plant has to survive an interior environment. After the interior holding period, a 45% to 55% reduction was observed on leaf, stem, and root soluble sugar concentrations, and stem and root starch concentrations decreased by 97%, and 62% to 72%, respectively, compared to the concentration at the end of production. The number of fronds increased in all treatments during the postproduction evaluation. However, the drastic carbohydrate concentration depletion during the interior holding period indicates that C. lutescens is not a species for extended use under very low interior light conditions.