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Cecil T. Pounders and Hamidou F. Sakhanokho

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Cecil T. Pounders and G. Sam Foster

A statistical model was used to partition the effects of age group, cutting position within the plant crown, and ramet environment on propagule development from stem cuttings collected from random stock plants of Ilex ×attenuata Ashe `Foster #2' (`Foster' holly). Most of the intra-clonal variation observed originated from sources not partitioned by the model. Small differences in growth were associated with sampling position within the crown. Repropagation gave no indication that factors measured by the model could be passed from ramet to propagule. Within-clone variation was not reduced by repropagation or by hedging propagules to force new growth.

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Cecil T. Pounders and G. Sam Foster

Analysis of clonal variation for two rooting traits of western hemlock [Tsuga heteterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.] clones indicated that realized genetic gain would be improved by more effective partitioning and reduction of environmental differences associated with clones. Interactions between clones and multiple propagation dates were significant, but clone rank changes between dates were minor. Number of meted cuttings per plot (RC) and number of main roots per cutting (MR) were more highly correlated genetically (1.06) than phenotypically (0.36). Broad-sense heritabilitiesHx 2 = 0.62 and Hx 2 = 0.79 for RC and MR, respectively) and predicted genetic gain from clonal selection were moderately high. Both the percentage of rooted cuttings and root system quality could be rapidly improved by the clonal selection procedures used.

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Cecil T. Pounders, Hamidou F. Sakhanokho and Leopold M. Nyochembeng

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Grant T. Kirker, Blair J. Sampson, Cecil T. Pounders, James M. Spiers and David W. Boyd Jr

Azalea lace bug (ALB), Stephanitis pyrioides (Scott), is an important economic pest of azaleas in the southeastern United States. In this study, 33 commercially available cultivars of evergreen azalea, Rhododendron spp., were evaluated for S. pyrioides feeding preference in both choice and no-choice feeding bioassays. Mean stomatal length and area, which were hypothesized to affect ALB feeding preference, were also measured for each of 33 cultivars and results were correlated with indices of ALB feeding (mean feces) and fecundity (mean eggs). An azalea cultivar, Fourth of July, was least preferred by ALB in both no-choice and choice tests, whereas ‘Watchet’ was most preferred. Cultivars Fourth of July and Delaware Valley White had the smallest mean stomatal areas despite their disparate susceptibilities to ALB feeding. Although stomates through which ALB insert their proboscides vary in size among azalea cultivars, they confer no obvious resistance to ALB feeding preference. Therefore, the mechanism for lace bug resistance in azalea remains elusive.

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Hamidou F. Sakhanokho, Anthony L. Witcher, Cecil T. Pounders and James M. Spiers