Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: C.A. Robinson x
Clear All Modify Search

In two field studies with `Redchief Delicious'/MM.106, 'Empire'/M.9/MM.106 and 'Mutsu'/M.9/MM. 106 trees on fertile silt loam soils, trickle irrigation increased vegetative growth during the first three years and resulted in a 16%-20% increase in cumulative yield over the first five years. When fertilizer was injected into the irrigation water weekly from mid-April until the end of June, tree growth was further increased and cumulative yield was improved an additional 11%-15% for a total of 27%-35% greater yield than the non-irrigated trees. In these studies, ground fertilization did not improve growth or yield unless trickle irrigation was also applied. However, ground fertilization was not as effective as fertigation.

Irrigation and fertigation increased the dry weight of roots by 23% and that of shoots by 36% in the first year resulting in a 10% reduction in the root/shoot ratio. Total tree dry weight was increased by 30% if trees were planted early (April 14) but only 14% if trees were planted late (June 10).

Early planting resulted in 17% greater cumulative yield than trees planted late. Initial tree caliper also had a significant effect on early growth and yield with large caliper trees yielding 12% more than the small caliper trees. The interaction of planting date, tree caliper and fertigation resulted in a 50%-70% increase in yield during the first five years.

Free access

Anthurium cultivars are being produced primarily as cut-flower plants. Whether Anthurium can be used as a flowering interiorscape plant is not well documented. Therefore, five finished Anthurium cultivars were evaluated in interior acclimatization rooms under two light intensities provided by cool-white fluorescent lamps for 12 hours daily: 16 mmol·m–2·s–1 (low light) and 48 16 mmol·m–2·s–1 (high light). Temperature of the rooms was maintained at 24 °C with a relative humidity of 60%. Total number of open flowers and number of senesced flowers were recorded weekly over 5 months. In addition, plant canopy height and width and total number of leaves were measured monthly. Number of open flowers per week ranged from 1.4 to 4.7 under low light and 2.4 to 6.3 under high light. The cultivar Red Hot showed the best performance with a weekly average flower count of 4.7 under low light and 6.3 under high light. All cultivars continued to produce new leaves, ranging from one to five per month under low light and two to five leaves under high light. Leaves were dark green and shiny under the interior conditions. Growth index of `Red Hot' increased 31% under low light and 20% under high light. Results from this study demonstrate that Anthurium can continue to grow and produce flowers under interior environmental conditions. Variation among cultivars indicates that genetic potential exists for selecting improved cultivars based on interior performance.

Free access

Aglaonema is among the most popular tropical ornamental foliage plants used indoors because of its bright foliar variegation, low light and humidity tolerance, and few pests. Aglaonema, however, has been labeled as one of the most chilling-sensitive foliage plants. The dark, greasy-appearing patches on leaves injured by chilling can result in completely unsalable plants. With recent breeding activity, more and more Aglaonema cultivars have been developed and released. How new cultivars respond to chilling temperatures is, however, mostly unclear. This study was undertaken to evaluate cultivar chilling responses to identify chilling-resistant cultivars. Twenty cultivars were chilled at 1.7, 4.4, 7.2, 10, and 12.7 °C for 24 h using a detached single-leaf method and also whole-plant assay. Results indicate that great genetic variation exists among the cultivars, ranging from no injury at 1.7 °C to severe injury at 12.7 °C. A popular cultivar, Silver Queen, is the most sensitive, while the cultivar Stars is the most resistant. There was also a chilling response difference based on leaf maturity. Young leaves showed less injury than did either mature or old leaves. In addition, there was a significant correlation between the single-leaf and whole-plant assay for chilling resistance in Aglaonema'; the single leaf assay could be particularly useful for a quick test.

Free access

We developed an Agrobacterium-mediated leaf disk transformation method for chrysanthemum. We introduced a chimeric chalcone synthase (CHS) gene isolated from chrysanthemum into cv. Moneymaker (pink type) to produce white-flowered plants. The CHS coding sequence was in antisense or sense orientation relative to the CaMV 35S promoter. 3.6% (3/83) antisense-transformed plants and 1.5% (2/133) sense-transformed plants produced completely white flowers. Pigment analysis revealed that this was due to a block at CHS. To study stability of color change of the white Moneymaker plants. Moneymaker, a Moneymaker regenerant, an antisense white (2706),and a sense white (31435) were compared. There was no difference between Moneymaker and the regenerant. Both 2706 and 31435 were vegetatively propagated with good stability; all plants produced white or very pale pink flowers. 2706 flowered 7 days late and 31435 10-12 days late. Flower number was similar for all four lines tested.

Free access

Children's gardens have recently been shown to increase life skills. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects that gardening/plant activities from the Junior Master Gardener curriculum, Literature in the Garden, have on children's life skills. The life skills examined were leadership, teamwork, self-understanding, decision-making skills, and communication skills. About 130 third-grade students from a Lee County, AL, school participated in the study. Students were equally divided into control and experimental groups, and each student was given the youth life skills inventory (YLSI) as a pre- and posttest. The experimental group participated in eight gardening/plant activities after the pretest, whereas the control group did not complete the activities. No significant differences were found between pretests and posttests for teamwork, self-understanding, decision making, communication, and overall life skills. Significant decreases from pretest to posttest were found on leadership skills for the experimental group. Several trends were observed with students who read more for fun, read more each week, and read more garden books generally increasing in life skills.

Full access

An increased incidence of graft union failure of apple trees during high wind events has been noted by researchers participating in the NC-140 regional rootstock testing project for certain rootstock-scion combinations. By measuring the strength of graft unions in a survey of mature apple trees in multiple stock-scion combinations, we have determined that there are significant differences. These differences may be attributable to genotype specific characteristics of rootstocks, scions, and/or rootstock-scion interactions. We are presently exploring potential biophysical and anatomical differences related to weak graft unions of apple rootstock and scion varieties. As traits correlated with weak graft unions are identified, they will be useful to help growers avoid the rootstock-scion combinations that are particularly susceptible to tree failure.

Free access

Effects of three sterol-demethylation inhibiting (DMI) fungicides and a contact fungicide were compared over two years at each of two locations to determine if fungicide treatments had differential effects on productivity, fruit size and shape, or gross returns for `Empire' apples (Malus ×domestica Borkh.). Treatments were applied four to five times per year during the primary apple scab season. Effects of treatments were assessed by comparing fruit set efficiencies, number of fruit per tree, total harvested fruit weight, and fruit length: diameter ratios at harvest. No significant differences were noted among individual treatments in any of the four trials. However, when treatments were contrasted by grouping individual treatments, significantly larger fruit size was noted for triflumizole treatments vs. combined fenarimol and myclobutanil treatments in one of the four trials and for captan or mancozeb compared to fenarimol and myclobutanil treatments in two trials. None of the DMI fungicides compared in these trials had any consistent adverse affect on fruit size, total yield, or estimated gross return per hectare. We conclude that the plant growth regulator effects of DMI fungicides are inconsistent and are unlikely to have significant economic impact on commercial apple production.

Free access